Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Gio26

UM3 print bed problem

Recommended Posts

I have another problem with my UM3.

The build plate to calibrate it correctly, I have to put it higher enough on the back of the two front left-right sides.

I also printed um3-buildplate-distance-tool (https://www.youmagine.com/designs/um3-buildplate-distance-tool) and also usign this I need to compensate in rear.

It is very cumbersome to do the manual leveling, I have to do it in attempts until I find the right rear position.

I encounter this problem from the first day.

The glass looks straight as well as the alluminium in the direction of the y-axis. Curved in the x-axis direction.

Is this normal? do I have to change some parts?

Thanks.

 

 

105933430_FrontLeft.thumb.JPG.82dbb2e89c70a957ba869fc30edae62f.JPGFrontRight.thumb.JPG.c0d0b215d136577f6c1a9c2e00d3c854.JPGRearCenter.thumb.JPG.e2fbf4d1d42180fea2d0dc8f110006b3.JPGPlateCenter.JPG.3ef42b8edc3e4ce6fd5e9ae21bd8b0cb.JPG23366644_PlateRear.thumb.JPG.a3ee0d4bcd2e1c04ce9a92f3fb1adeab.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the last photo that looks like too much warping of your glass.  This will be a problem if you try to print in either of the 2 rear corners but not a problem for small parts.

 

Please remove the glass and test the glass by itself (the aluminum plate can pull the glass into this shape so see if it's the glass or the aluminum that has most of the warp).

 

If the glass has this much warp then tell your reseller you want another one or you'll return the whole printer.  Meanwhile keep using this glass until you get the replacement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks gr5.

The last photo is without glass, sorry me for the photo not very good.

The glass seems good.

I have problem to hit the right z measure and i dont know why but I see if I change the distance between glass and alluminium the z change.

 

I'm more worried about the difference between the back and the front.

whenever I do the manual leveling I need to try a lot of time for hit the correct measure of rear plate. If I do about 14mm in all 3 points I cant complete manual leveling because in to front the bed is crushed to the nozzle.

Really thanks for your support.

 

Edited by Gio26

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On my UM3 I actually bent the aluminum plate up in the rear corners.  I just used my hands and pulled very hard.  Later I realized that on the other side of that aluminum plate are circuit traces for the heater bed and I could have broken a trace and broken the heater for the heated bed.  But anyway it worked and my glass is very flat now on my UM3.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Gio26 said:

If I do about 14mm in all 3 points I cant complete manual leveling because in to front the bed is crushed to the nozzle.

You don't need to measure this 14mm distance.  

 

Watch this video and skip to the part where I level the UM2.  UM3 is the same except there is a final extra step for the second core.

 

Jump to 4:54 (4 minutes 54 seconds):

 

For my UM3 I usually use the calibration card - I make sure I feel the same resistance at the rear, at the front two screws and for the second core.

 

Also around 3:14 you can see how to level "on the fly".  Once you get the leveling good it will stay there for weeks and months without needing updating.  That's one reason I don't care about autolevel.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, gr5 said:

On my UM3 I actually bent the aluminum plate up in the rear corners.  I just used my hands and pulled very hard.  Later I realized that on the other side of that aluminum plate are circuit traces for the heater bed and I could have broken a trace and broken the heater for the heated bed.  But anyway it worked and my glass is very flat now on my UM3.

In my Chinese printers I did it myself without thinking about it. On the new UM3 ... I'm still thinking about it. ?

 

Thanks.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The S5 has multi-point leveling.  The S5 and UM3 use the same firmware.  I'm hoping they release multi-point leveling for the UM3 some day and then it won't matter as much if your glass is warped a little.  Although of course the bottom of your (very large) prints will be shaped like the glass so this isn't a perfect cure.  But it will at least allow parts to stick well in the rear 2 corners.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • Introducing Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta
      Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta is available. It comes with new features, bug fixes, and UX improvements. We would really like to have your feedback on it to make our stable release as good as it can be. As always, you can download the beta for free from our website, for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.
        • Like
      • 95 replies
    • Print Core CC | Red for Ruby
      Q: For some users, abrasive materials may be a new subject matter. Can you explain what it is that makes a material abrasive when you are not sure which print core to use?
      A: Materials which are hard in a solid piece (like metals, ceramics and carbon fibers) will generally also wear down the nozzle. In general one should assume...
        • Like
      • 30 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!