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aag

UM in cold room -> warping and other unpleasantnesses

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I have no other option but to place my Ultimaker S5 in an unheated basement room. This was fine until the room temperature dropped to 10°C (or less), and now it is becoming impossible to get good prints. Breakaway and PLA tend to warp horribly, and I presume that this is because of the huge temperature gradient: the newly added layers cool down too quickly and contract, whereas the lower layers are kept warm by the heated bed plate.

 

How can I remedy to this situation? As I said, moving the printer is not an option. Heating the whole room is impractical and too expensive. I was thinking of adding a cover (https://accante.com/en/) but I fear that this is not going to be enough. Are there any add-ons that would allow to keep a well-controlled air temperature within the printing chamber?

Edited by aag

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Hmm, you need definitely an external heater to bring the printer environment to 20-25°. So the cover you have linked will not work, it will be better but not enough.

 

Do you have the possibility to build a small print room within this basement and put a small heater inside, just to heat this area? I don't know the word in Englisch, but I mean to use these plaster panels (hope you know what I mean)

 

Or if not possible to build a bigger box of wood, but not just for the printer, higher that you can put a small table inside and a small heater.

 

Another idea, but just an idea, not sure if it really works, if you put a radiant heater beside the printer, which should just heat up the area around the printer and only during printing. They are normally quite fast with their ventilation. 

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I thought that I might attach something like this to the cover: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Black-NEW-100W-12V-DC-PTC-Fan-Heater-Constant-Temperature-Incubator-Hot-Space-Thermostat/32839650955.html

 

It would still need some kind of thermostat though. It's going to be a rather involved modification, I fear.

Edited by aag

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What if you put a piece of plastic or cardboard in the front opening, like a sort of primitive door, but with a few holes in it? So there is some circulation to evacuate the heat, but not too much?

 

At least, cardboard is cheap, so it could be a good test to see if this really is the cause, and not something else that happened to occur at the same moment (e.g. dirty, oily glass).

 

Edited by geert_2

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