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I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question


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Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

I just got my 1st 3D printer, a Ender 3 Pro. I have already had a few basic classes on Cura at Confluent Space. I can download files from thingiverse, make the code and put the code on the SD card. And I have 3d printed a Star Trek TOS model of the Nomad, unmanned, prob. That just required coding and transferring the code to the SD card.  Now I want to remove the lowered wording on the side of the E3Pro Enhanced tool holder in the file  https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5199812

I don't know how to change the Y axis to make the word disappear. I know the basics of the of the X, Y and Z axis's. I am well versed in Win 10 default 2D paint. 3d paint, Cura is a completely new ball of wax.

 

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    Cura is a tool for slicing 3d models, ie to create gcode from models. It is not a tool for editing 3d models. Though you can do some edits in Cura, there are often better tools for that.

     

    Blender is free, but it is so powerful that it has a fairly steep learning curve.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    Blender, TinkerCad, MS 3D builder...There are much better softwares for editing STL files than Cura.  That being said, Support Blockers can be used in a lot of ways.  Moving them into exact positions in Cura can be difficult.

    The model on the right has been merged in MS 3D Builder and the letters are gone.  The model on the left still has the letters but there is a Support Blocker configured as an Infill Mesh that covers the letters.

     

    image.thumb.png.94de97e693893267b386846b3925f3d1.png

     

    In the X-Ray view you can see the difference.  The rectangular shape around "Creality" in the model on the left is the support blocker configured to print just the walls.  The outside wall exactly coincides with the outside wall of the model.  The right model would print better as there are no "over-lapping" meshes in the slice.

    Now it is true that I could post the model with no lettering, or a project file with the support blocker.  In the long term it's better that you run up that "Learning Curve" all by yourself.

     

    image.thumb.png.cf41d0988ced4e53703397dfe55a7ff1.png

     

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    Posted (edited) · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    To JohnathanSmith1

    I want to remove the word on the side of the file bellow. I also want to learn how to do it. I also have Blender and MS 3D paint. I am fairly good at MS 2D and 3D paint. 1 question about Cura.  Where in Cura do I find the settings to set the bed and nozzle temp for the Ender 3 Pro? I don't want to wast the money spent on getting it and only print the bed leveler file.  My laptop has been setup to print, but not my mini desktop pc. If I have to uninstall,reinstall Cura or god help me the laptop totally crashes and I have to reinstall everything. I lose the Cura settings.

     

    image.thumb.png.94de97e693893267b386846b3925f3d1.png

     

     

    Edited by reble
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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    You need to play around with the Cura main screen menus and buttons and just click on things to see what comes up and where the settings are.  Each material you may select will have default printing temperatures.  The settings on a fresh installation of Cura are basic but can be set to Advanced mode.

    On the right side of the Prepare screen right below the titlebar is a slide button.  Turn on "Custom".  Then you will see the Settings Search box.  To the right of that search box is an icon with three lines on it.  It is the Settings Visibility button.  Click on it and set the visibility to "All".  Temperatures are in the Material section.

    Go to the MarketPlace.  There are various plugins (add-in programs) that you can install.  One of them is Printer Settings and another is Material Settings.  They contain some non-mainstream settings and you will want to be aware of them.

    If you click on Settings/Printers/Manage Printers/Machine Settings you will bring up a dialog that shows how your printer is defined as well as the StartUp and Ending gcode scripts.  It's stuff you need to know.

    Just play around.  It isn't like you can hurt anything.  Start with simple models from Thingiverse and other sites.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    GregValiant  

     

    Thingiverse is the only place that I know of at this time to d/l files.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    A search for "free stl files" will turn up other sites.  Thingiverse has a lot of stuff and a fair percentage is for people to bling their printers.  On the surface, some of that stuff seems...silly?...dumb?...useless?  But you are getting good practice at making things and so I think they serve a larger purpose as learning tools.

    One of my favorite downloads (I ended up designing my own) are the covers for the unused wheel slots in the aluminum frame of the printer.  Specifically, the ones below the Auto-Home position of the nozzle.  I was always picking stray pieces and wisps of filament out of those slots until I covered them.  It is easier to clean up the machine now.

     

    I am the proud designer of the #1 totally most useless "upgrade" you can make to an Ender 3 Pro.  I have it posted on Thingiverse.  Folks learn something about "removing supports" from this bad boy.  The effect on the actual print quality of the printer is hard to qualify, but I suspect most people would see a huge amount of not much difference.

    DSCN2771.thumb.JPG.7371e5026e670b85458adaffd343194b.JPG

     

     

     

     

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    1 thing I do when I am learning a new software, is what you are saying about,  example (about setting the nozzle and bed  temp in Cura) I have been putting what you said to do in Wordpad notes and saving it as a rtf, file on the HDD drive in the USB case. I have a stack full of notes like that saved. That's how I learn.  By referencing the notes when I have to do the same procedure again.

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    Posted (edited) · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    It is good to have a plan.  Whether you are going to make prototype parts for a company, functional pieces for yourself, or art pieces that you will paint or otherwise finish, the learning curve is not an easy one.  Here is a little list.

    1. Make sure the printer is assembled as accurately as you can get it.  Do not assume that just because some parts may have been assembled by the factory that they were assembled correctly.
      1. The X Y and Z must all be exactly 90° to each other.  Get out some tools (like a carpenters tri-square) and check them.
      2. All the trolley wheels must be adjusted correctly.  You should just be able to turn them with your fingers.
      3. The belts are adjusted correctly.  They should twang like the strings of a bass guitar.
      4. The cables going to the hot end and the extruder are supported and out of the way.
      5. There is no wobble in the X beam or the print head.
      6. All the screws have been checked for tightness.
      7. The end of the bowden tube is cut at exactly 90° and is butted up against the back end of the nozzle.
    2. Calibrate the E-steps.  There are lots of videos on how to do that.  Measure the filament and get the exact diameter and enter it into Cura in the material settings.  If you need to make a custom material in order to make a change to the diameter then do it.  The E-steps and the filament diameter are the main ingredients used by Cura to calculate the amount of filament to push in order to make an extrusion.
    3. The first layer is extremely important.  It is the base for everything that gets added above.  Whether you have an ABL or level with a piece of paper - a properly "leveled" build plate is a must.  If the first layer doesn't stick then you won't be having any fun.  I manually level with a piece of paper and it is not difficult but it is a practiced art.
    4. Start with simple models.  Do not decide to print some gigantic monster with a sword that needs all kinds of supports as your first print.  The 3D benchy is good.  Calibration cubes are good.  I am attaching a couple of models that I designed as calibrations for users.  You can scale them in Cura to make them smaller if you like and print them with different settings and see what works for your machine.  The ShapeA file can be printed in Vase mode (Spiralize Outer Contour).  The ShapeH file uses supports and they are not impossible to remove but you will need to think about it.

    I've typed enough for now.

     

    GV_CalibrationShapeA.stl GV_CalibrationShapeH.stl

    Edited by GregValiant
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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question
    54 minutes ago, GregValiant said:

    It is good to have a plan.  Whether you are going to make prototype parts for a company, functional pieces for yourself, or art pieces that you will paint or otherwise finish, the learning curve is not an easy one.  Here is a little list.

    1. Make sure the printer is assembled as accurately as you can get it.  Do not assume that just because some parts may have been assembled by the factory that they were assembled correctly.
      1. The X Y and Z must all be exactly 90° to each other.  Get out some tools (like a carpenters tri-square) and check them.
      2. All the trolley wheels must be adjusted correctly.  You should just be able to turn them with your fingers.
      3. The belts are adjusted correctly.  They should twang like the strings of a bass guitar.
      4. The cables going to the hot end and the extruder are supported and out of the way.
      5. There is no wobble in the X beam or the print head.
      6. All the screws have been checked for tightness.
      7. The end of the bowden tube is cut at exactly 90° and is butted up against the back end of the nozzle.
    2. Calibrate the E-steps.  There are lots of videos on how to do that.  Measure the filament and get the exact diameter and enter it into Cura in the material settings.  If you need to make a custom material in order to make a change to the diameter then do it.  The E-steps and the filament diameter are the main ingredients used by Cura to calculate the amount of filament to push in order to make an extrusion.
    3. The first layer is extremely important.  It is the base for everything that gets added above.  Whether you have an ABL or level with a piece of paper - a properly "leveled" build plate is a must.  If the first layer doesn't stick then you won't be having any fun.  I manually level with a piece of paper and it is not difficult but it is a practiced art.
    4. Start with simple models.  Do not decide to print some gigantic monster with a sword that needs all kinds of supports as your first print.  The 3D benchy is good.  Calibration cubes are good.  I am attaching a couple of models that I designed as calibrations for users.  You can scale them in Cura to make them smaller if you like and print them with different settings and see what works for your machine.  The ShapeA file can be printed in Vase mode (Spiralize Outer Contour).  The ShapeH file uses supports and they are not impossible to remove but you will need to think about it.

    I've typed enough for now.

     

    GV_CalibrationShapeA.stl 59.55 kB · 0 downloads GV_CalibrationShapeH.stl 107.89 kB · 0 downloads

    GregValiant I had help pulling the 3D printer together from the box and assembling it by the instructor at the Confluent Space School      https://confluent.space/   .  I have been taking lessons there. I already know how to take a file from Thingiverse,  code the file, send the file to the SD card, put the SD card in the printer, setup the printer and print the file. I already printed all of the parts for Star Trek TOS, the Nomad deep space probe at school. I just have to glue it all together and paint it. I found the Nomad file on Thingiverse.  The school is closed right now. The board of directors are squabbling like children about expanding the school and where the funds are going to come from. So ppl like me have to go to other sources to learn how to use the 3D printer. I have an upper hand. I have an AA degree in electronics, fixing radios, tv's, computers and so, on. I know how to fix switching computer power supplys. I am also an Amateur Radio Operator. I do a lot of digital HF transmitting on the air. And digital transmitting on the internet.  3D printing is a new hobby for me.

    BTW I found the place in Cura to change the nozzle and bed temperature's. But the temp's are in celsius not fahrenhenit.  The instructions that I have are to set the temp's in fahrenhenit.   I did search and recuse in the Civil Air Patrol.  I know how to calculate (C) to (F) and the other way around.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    Just turn the Fahrenheit part of your brain off and use °C.  It's just a number you plug in and doesn't change much unless you change material.  Same with the bed temperature.

    When you design models you can design in English units (they call them Barbarian units around here) and scale the models by 2540% in Cura.  I've been designing in Metric units for a long time and it just doesn't matter which one you use.

     

    You have enough printing experience now that the requirements of models (for support, infill density, number of walls required, etc.) should be starting to become apparent just by looking at the preview.  Fusion 360 is a popular choice as a design software.  I was a CAD designer for years using AutoCAD and Mechanical Desktop (precursor to Inventor) so I am most familiar with the AutoDesk products.  Whether you have access to another high-end software or go with a freeware package is your choice.  Knowing how to design your own models and/or modify existing STL files (Blender, MS 3D Builder, etc) is a real plus.  More learning curve though.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    With 3d printing, whether it is your printer or Cura - EVERYTHING is metric.  If you see a temperature that says "F" it is probably a typo and they mean "C".  Room temp is around 20C, water boils at 100C and printing takes place around 200C (depending on type of plastic).  That's all you need to memorize - those 3 numbers are probably enough.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    Question. I am a volunteer sales person in the Veterans Warehouse Thrift Store in the electronics dept. I stumbled across   a 3D pen-v2 complete in the box, new unopened with a stack of unused, different  color filaments that got donated. I payed $7.00 for the whole thing. The pen works great. But with the micro tremors in my hands, I had to retire in 1995 from fixing radios, tv's and so on, and free hand art painting, I couldn't hold the soldering iron still or a brush anymore. My question is will the pen's filament's work in my Ender 3 Pro printer? Or is the pen going to end up been a nice fat wall hanger. Just for info. My job in the electronics dept is checking over the antique electronic stuff. You ask some of the younger guys in my dept what a vacuum tube is and you get a big fat ???????.   lol  

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    The filament will work fine.  It uses PLA filament with a diameter of 1.75mm which is the same as most 3d printers including the Ender 3.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    Thanks gr5. You never guess what gets donated at the store. I found a  John Wayne cook clock with the ( D) battery holders corroded. I am going to have to 3D print 2 new (D) battery holders in order to get the sound working.  The clock it self works fine.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    The pen I bought came with ABS filament.  ABS gives off some noxious fumes and is prone to warping without a "heated build volume" and the bed at 110°.  The pen has a temperature adjustment and I can run PLA through it.

     

    Just to double check - if it will extrude at 200° then it's probably PLA.  If it's ABS it will work but require some adjustments to how you print.

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    Posted (edited) · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question
    2 hours ago, GregValiant said:

    The pen I bought came with ABS filament.  ABS gives off some noxious fumes and is prone to warping without a "heated build volume" and the bed at 110°.  The pen has a temperature adjustment and I can run PLA through it.

     

    Just to double check - if it will extrude at 200° then it's probably PLA.  If it's ABS it will work but require some adjustments to how you print.

    I probably will not use the 3D pen because I can't hold the pen still to make a straight line with the micro tremors in my hands.

     

    PS: The box and the extra bag came with PLA  filament in it. The filament is melting at 200c.

    Edited by reble
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    Posted (edited) · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    There ya go.  The filament should work perfect with your printer.

    My father had to give up tying flies and fishing jigs when his tremors got bad (Parkinson's).  I keep waiting for it to start with me but so far I've been fortunate.

    Edited by GregValiant
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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    I was born with my hand tremors.  I went through a hand and eye coordination training prog.  Over time and age I am losing some control.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    BINGO!!!!!  I just 3D printed my 1st file on my 3D printer.  😄

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    BTW,  I goofed on 1 step in Cura.  I forgot to make the Gcode and save the Gcode to the SD card.  I was trying to run the file from the STL version of the file.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    That's actually a fairly common mistake.  Congratulations on your first print!

     

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    Question, I know this is a different subject.  It is about MS 3D paint. I have it installed but I can't find the icon to open the program.

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    Posted · I just got a new 3D printer and I have a question

    Start Button and then scroll down to the "P" programs.  Paint 3D should be in there.  I seem to recall it used to be in an Accessories folder somewhere.  Besides changing the name they moved it.

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