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qwarks

Smaller nozzle?

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Hi Everyone.

In my eternal quest for finer and higher quality print, i stumbled upon someone talking about 0,2mm and 0,15mm nozzle sizes, and that got me thinking.. Has any of you tried a finer nozzle, and if you have, where du you get one?

Another thing i wanted to share with you, is that, i have had a few things printed at my local 3D printer guy BU (Before Ultimaker), at a very high cost, because of the very expensive machines he own and the very expensive filament he uses.

I told him that i have bought a "reprap" printer and he kind of padded me compassionately on the shoulder with his nodding/ half smiling/patronizing expression. Now i have had my Ultimaker for about three weeks, and the prints are getting better and better.

The other day i went to show him a print that i made on the ultimaker - a print from the same file that he printed for me on hi's machines just a few month's ago. I just loved the way his expression went from patronizing to utter disbelieve!

The model i showed him, had better resolution and was much stronger than his ABS printed model... I could tell that he felt sick yo his stomach :lol: - well you should'nt kick a man who lying down, but MAN THAT WAS FUN!! :lol:

Anyway, any feedback on my question is appreciated.

Thank you.

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I've heard of people using 0.35mm but nothing smaller. There'd be lots of bowden tubes a poppin' I should imagine?

AFAIK, the UM standard nozzle is 0.35mm. you can check it by extruding some filament into mid air and measuring the string that comes out of the nozzle. (my makergear nozzle is nominal 0.5mm, but 0.56 in reality).

using a smaller nozzle works just fine, you just have to change your expectation how many mm^3/sec you can squeeze through the small hole (which involves just going slower), other than that, it's no problem.

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