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rguzzo

Nozzle Clog

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I have been using my 1 week old Ultimaker2 and having few issues around material feed, but this morning when going to print I am getting nothing. Previously I have just put the temp up to 260C and had no issues.

Right now I am running a print job at 260C... 5 minutes in still no material coming out. I have some project deadlines I am coming up on. Anything will help

 

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Rguzzo

I've had this same problem and solved it without disassembling the nozzle, what seems to be a delicate task, that can potentially create new problems.

Frequently when I start to print and get nothing, I do the following.

1. Go to Maintenance, Advanced, Move Material.

2. Wait till the temperature rises, then try to turn the knob clockwise and check if the material is coming out.

3. If the material does not come out, introduce a needle ( it must have a diameter less than 0.4mm) from under the nozzle, than move the wheel again.

4. If that doesn't work, change material. You will see that the material is partially dented. Cut this part out and reintroduce it in the feeder.

5. 10 in 10 times this has solved my clogging problems so far.

I observed that in some days, specially when its raining and humidity is high, printing becomes very difficult. I still need to understand this better.

I also still want to see a well documented (with text and good pictures or even with a video) dismantling of the feeder and the nozzle. For me these are the main critical points yet to be covered for a basic maintenance of the U2

Celso

 

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Rguzzo

I've had this same problem and solved it without disassembling the nozzle, what seems to be a delicate task, that can potentially create new problems.

Frequently when I start to print and get nothing, I do the following.

1. Go to Maintenance, Advanced, Move Material.

2. Wait till the temperature rises, then try to turn the knob clockwise and check if the material is coming out.

3. If the material does not come out, introduce a needle ( it must have a diameter less than 0.4mm) from under the nozzle, than move the wheel again.

4. If that doesn't work, change material. You will see that the material is partially dented. Cut this part out and reintroduce it in the feeder.

5. 10 in 10 times this has solved my clogging problems so far.

I observed that in some days, specially when its raining and humidity is high, printing becomes very difficult. I still need to understand this better.

I also still want to see a well documented (with text and good pictures or even with a video) dismantling of the feeder and the nozzle. For me these are the main critical points yet to be covered for a basic maintenance of the U2

Celso

 

Celso,

Thank you very much for the detailed response! I will give it a try, I am having a little bit of material come out then it seems to stop flowing... I am not sure if there is a way to counter act this. Is the bolt in the back to tight limiting material flow?

Let me know if you have any quick fixes for this, I am going to head to a local store and get a sewing needle.

 

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Please post a photo.

But most likely you'd have to heat up the nozzle you the PLA starts to melt and you can yank it out. Be careful not to burn yourself!

 

Here is a picture, http://imgur.com/Z6VokQg

Update: Just got it out, had to take the nozzle piece off and clean it gently by hand... the filament still isn't coming through properly without a little hand force

 

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