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Brute force, bad for slicers, better for extruders

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I just wanted to say, 150mm/s and 0.32mm layer thickness at 200 degrees through a 0.4mm nozzle.

And I'll leave these here.....

IMAG0341

IMAG0340

IMAG0339

IMAG0338

IMAG0337

Also, 200mm/s retraction...

Ok that was kind of a lie at the top.

It will absolutely do that, but I have to turn the stepper current up too high, as it stalls out at that speed and lower current. With a normal current setting, I can run 100mm/s at .32mm layer thickness and 200 degrees.The filament never slips, the stepper just stalls, which is awesome as the filament neer grinds out so I havnt lost a single print since installing it. =D Happy days.

 

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At 100mm/sec .32 layer .4 nozzle, that's 8mm^3/sec. I've seen people do 15mm^3/sec (about twice as fast) even on the UM2 (but at 230C! 200C is impressive) (although my limit on my UM2 is closer to 8mm^3 at 230C).

However what really impresses me is 200mm/sec retraction. The menu system on the UM2 only lets you go up to 35mm/sec which seems ridiculously slow. And on the UM Original I think around 30mm/sec is the max speed.

Maybe you should do a more exacting test like this one...

http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/4222-pulling-force-of-um-extruder/?p=34887

 

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