Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Sign in to follow this  
ultiarjan

GoPro front audio frame

Recommended Posts

Hi,

made this "ear frame", to better pick up audio only from the front of the GoPro, but it seems to have hardly any effect..... any GoPro expert out there who could tell me why I hardly notice any difference between front and back ?

The mic is in the middle of the "ear" part of the frame.....

TheEar

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Focal Point, very cool idea, with the focal point you may need to play with the mounting. :) maybe make the cone clip on as to have the ability to clip on larger "ears" for ability to capture audio at a much larger directional distance. This would be good for wildlife or spying purposes :D

reflectioncurved.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bad news :(

The Ear printed

Nice print, nice design, bad functionality..... tested it by talking and walking around it, the sound from the back seems just as loud as sound from the front.

I'll have a look at external mic's. At least the good thing is I now have a good model of a perfectly fitting "frame" if I want to design one later for mounting an external mic...

Maybe as a last try I need to test it out in the open... as the sound is really dampend when you put a finger on the mic holes.... so theoretically it should have some effect...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe attach some foam rubber to the backside of your dome? Since it's so small of an area, if sound hits that plastic from the back, it could be resonating the entire dome, which then directs the sound down into the mic because of its shape. Maybe 1/2" to 1" thick might deaden anything from that side.

If that does have an effect, then maybe printing your reflector in something softer, like soft pla, would also work better? If it does, then try making the dome thicker, say 1/4"~1/2" with maybe 25% infill. A solid object will pass sound better than one with an air cavity.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all you need to model a parabolic curve where the focal point is just inside the mic. Not a sphere. Not an ellipse. A parabola with the axis of the parabola facing towards where the sound is coming from.

Second of all I'm not sure how well this will work at typical audio frequencies. The wavelength of middle A is 440 Hz and where sound is about 300 meters per second 300/440 is (very roughly) a meter in wavelength. I'm not sure if such a tiny parabola has much effect. Of course if you go up to 10KHz (almost 5 octaves higher on the piano! Well that's above all the notes on a piano but still can hear it) I would expect a huge improvement. But again if you get the shape of the parabola wrong by even just 3mm here and there it won't work at all. In other words a sphere shaped surface won't work any better than a cube shaped.

Try tones from your watch and line them up exactly with the axis of the parabola - at least 20 feet in front of the camera. Very high pitches.

Most parabolic microphones are seen at sports events and are at least a half meter in diameter.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Our picks

    • Introducing Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta
      Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta is available. It comes with new features, bug fixes, and UX improvements. We would really like to have your feedback on it to make our stable release as good as it can be. As always, you can download the beta for free from our website, for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.
        • Like
      • 95 replies
    • Print Core CC | Red for Ruby
      Q: For some users, abrasive materials may be a new subject matter. Can you explain what it is that makes a material abrasive when you are not sure which print core to use?
      A: Materials which are hard in a solid piece (like metals, ceramics and carbon fibers) will generally also wear down the nozzle. In general one should assume...
        • Like
      • 30 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!