Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
memory556

Should I go for ZBrush?

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone.

I've been looking around for a 3D Modeling software. I've messed around with Sketchup and Blender. Both were ok. SolidWorks looks awesome, but I don't have that kind of money to just drop, sadly. I have come across ZBrush. I love the concept of it, and I was wanting to get some of your opinions of it. Should I go for ZBrush or not? Thank you for the help!

MemorY

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really want to start learning Zbrush, i hear it is pretty complicated.

But I guess that goes for mostly all CAD modeling tools.

The bottom question I think is, what do you want to make?

There is a big difference in whether you want to be making Bustes or Architectural models, as an example..

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Solidworks and Zbrush are two totally different modelling packages, so if your more into your organic modelling and characters etc then go for Zbrush. I can use Creo/Solidworks pretty well for all kinds of mechanical things, with parametric modelling...however because of my Parametric mechanical mind I found Zbrush sooooooo hard!! There are loads of tutorial videos online though, and as suggested above go for Sculptris first which is a great little version of Zbrush but is free.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Solidworks and Zbrush are two totally different modelling packages, so if your more into your organic modelling and characters etc then go for Zbrush. I can use Creo/Solidworks pretty well for all kinds of mechanical things, with parametric modelling...however because of my Parametric mechanical mind I found Zbrush sooooooo hard!! There are loads of tutorial videos online though, and as suggested above go for Sculptris first which is a great little version of Zbrush but is free.

 

Ya. I just like SolidWorks because it had a lot of functionality and has a pretty big community. So it'd be easy to get answers to questions.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your organic stuff, check out MOI 3d. they have a 30 day trial and it costs I think about $400 US you can do mechanical things in it too but its more oriented towards organic models.

Also check out DesignSpark Mechanical for mechanical things.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your organic stuff, check out MOI 3d. they have a 30 day trial and it costs I think about $400 US you can do mechanical things in it too but its more oriented towards organic models.

Also check out DesignSpark Mechanical for mechanical things.

 

Ok. I've seen a few topics here about them, but haven't looked into them that much. Thank you.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Z-Brush is an incredible piece of software which I love using, and which I think is actually really good value for money for everything it can do. But it's important to understand that it is solely a freeform sculpting package. You basically start with a ball of clay and pull it into shape. It's not for making accurate flat-sided geometric shapes with known dimensions - like mechanical parts.

Sculptris is a very, very cut down version of Z-Brush, and has one major drawback for 3D printing use - it doesn't remesh the shapes - i.e., re-covering your edited object with a new simpler mesh of triangles when it intersects itself or gets twisted - but instead keeps contorting the original one, so that it is fairly easy to end up with a very complicated, self-intersecting mesh that will confuse slicers and be hard to print.

DSM is the free version of SpaceClaim - which is another awesome piece of software for doing more geometric/mechanical work. SpaceClaim is a few thousand dollars, but still cheap compared to something like SolidWorks I think. DSM does most of what you need for most 3D print modeling, however, and is free.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one thing missing from DSM is loft or blending. That's actually the reason why I purchased MOI 3D.

 

If you are unfamiliar with those terms, it the process by which you draw 2D shapes and blend between them.

 

Does it blend the shapes regardless of anchor point placement in your example? or do you need to keep the number of anchor points and positions relatively consistent throughout the U-loft?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • Taking Advantage of DfAM
      This is a statement that’s often made about AM/3DP. I'll focus on the way DfAM can take advantage of some of the unique capabilities that AM and 3DP have to offer. I personally think that the use of AM/3DP for light-weighting is one of it’s most exciting possibilities and one that could play a key part in the sustainability of design and manufacturing in the future.
        • Like
      • 3 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!