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DidierKlein

Proto-Pasta Stainless Steel and Magnetic Iron PLA Filament

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from reddit by protopastsa.

"Full testing is pending, but the particles are spherical and finely ground. We had that concern with our CFPLA because the carbon is chopped and rough, but have yet to see unnatural wear on our nozzle even after 6 months of exclusive use on our Printrbot Simple Metal. The steel filament is less abrasive than the carbon, but a bit more abrasive than standard PLA.

That being said, when discussing this issue, we've often heard the argument that 3PD nozzles are consumables, like spark plugs or filters in your car, that have to be replaced at a rate consistent with how often you drive, er, print. Not that that is an excuse to market a product that would destroy printers, which we would never do, but over time wear happens no matter what you are printing with.

TL;DR: Full testing is pending, but we don't expect this to be a major issue."

So i guess that's consistent with your carbon fiber woes... Think I'll wait to see on this one...

 

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It might mean you can magnetize it afterwards, though :)

I am curious how all this metal filled material is affecting the hot-end. Especially steel and similar metals are a bit harder than the hot-end itself, typically causing a lot of abrasion and wear. I asked Colorfabb about this and they said they did not really test this/had a chance to test this due to time constraints.

We will see, but I would expect a significantly increasing wear with ever harder fill materials.

 

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It might mean you can magnetize it afterwards, though :)

I am curious how all this metal filled material is affecting the hot-end. Especially steel and similar metals are a bit harder than the hot-end itself, typically causing a lot of abrasion and wear. I asked Colorfabb about this and they said they did not really test this/had a chance to test this due to time constraints.

We will see, but I would expect a significantly increasing wear with ever harder fill materials.

 

See reply #5, reply directly from protopasta

 

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I read it :) They are careful not to be too conclusive yet, and of course, it comes from a party that has a huge interest in selling the product.

If it turns out to be what they say, it seems to be not a huge issue.

 

I dunno... they're saying that nozzles are considered consumables. Which, while valid, is kind of scary to hear from a filament manufacturer concerning wear and tear on the nozzle. There is another thread on here where glowfill has ground down the filament to the point of unusability after a 40 hour print.

I think I'll wait to see how it goes from the brave and experimental folks.

 

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