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polle

cura scale rounding, deletes decimal places

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Hi

I wanted to compensate the shrinking and apply the scale accordingly. Then I recognized that Cura deletes numbers, after you set the second input field.

For example 1,003 results in 1,0. It seems that it keeps the value and just stops showing the last digits. At first I thought it Rounds the values ... Don't know, its kinda confusing.

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Without looking at the Cura code...

Almost all software will show numbers to some fixed precision - say 3 or 4 decimal places max. With a floating point representation there's no easy way to know which of the imprecisely stored digits constitute the correct level of rounding in your thinking. It also can't store to an abitrary precision.

The memory of the number of digits you entered is lost as soon as the number is converted to floating point. The only way it could satisfy your expectations would be to store reals as strings or very big scaled integers.

 

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I noticed this too. The number still works, it's just not displayed. Actually what I would like to see is a profile setting that stores the scaling. This way different materials (profiles) can have a default scaling for shrinkage.

0.3% doesn't seem to me like such a small number; my printer is better than 0.5% accuracy once I adjust for shrinkage. And often I make press fit parts that go with other non-printed objects.

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@ rpress: Recognized that too, earlier today. The Numbers disappear but the scaling is still applied :) Profile for that setting is a really good idea!

@ IRobertl: Its really not that much (~ 0,5mm for 100mm). I printed a prototype and that thing didn't fit to the other part. Then I thought the printer is off and looked for calibration. After that I learned about the shrinkage of printed stuff :) Now I know what I have to keep in mind for designing stuff, but still its no work to apply the scale and get near 100% prints.

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