Jump to content
Cura Connect | Survey Read more... ×
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Nicolinux

Apple is using Ultimaker(s)

Recommended Posts

 

 

Well, Ultimaker is the Apple of 3D printers.

 

No no no...., Apple is the most closed ecosystem there is ....  bad path to follow ...

 

Totally true, but in terms of clean design and (apparently) cool ecosystem, Ultimaker is the Apple of 3D printing.

 

Yeah, have to admit in both cases the hardware is looking pretty good :)

(actually looking at an original "bondyblue" imac in my printroom I'm still keeping because it's an icon I can't seem to separate from...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Well, Ultimaker is the Apple of 3D printers.

 

I consider makerbot to be the apple, far to expensive, closed off and limited in capability on purpose

 

HAHA! i like the comparison, and i can only agree about the Apple part ( i know nothing about the Makerbot's) BUT.. i do love the Iphone bbut will never switch to Macbook..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't dismiss something just out of principle because that's silly.

I have used Linux, Windows and Mac OS X for many years and concluded that the Mac is the operating system with the least amount of suck in terms of productivity together with hackability. That's why I am using Linux on servers, Windows for games and the Mac for work.

Yes it is more expensive but you have to ask why. The insane amount of Research & Development Apple puts into every product is (presumably) unmatched by any other. That's why their stuff is expensive. And of course, they are no angels and want to earn as much money as possible.

But I'd wager the statement that _any_ other vendor would be more than happy to be at least a little like Apple. And I don't see anything wrong with making the best products ever and make money with it.

Sure there are downsides. Closed source, secrecy and arrogance. I guess the later two are unavoidable when you grow so big but the closed ecosystem is due to the braindead patent system and the fierce competition that they have to put up with.

I'd be happy if Ultimaker really becomes the Apple of consumer 3d printers. They don't need to make each of Apple's mistakes and only take the good things from it. But if they make the best consumer 3d printer with super stable performance and lots of ingenious convenience featues - I don't mind the higher price at all.

Edited by Guest
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used Linux, Windows and Mac OS X for many years and concluded that the Mac is the operating system with the least amount of suck in terms of productivity together with hackability.

 

I have used the same since the early Slackware and Red Hat days. I don't find my productivity to be significantly different between the three; productivity is more a function of the application software design than the OS. I'm not a gamer but I understand your motivation for your choice there. I find that I can get Linux to do what I want more easily than the others when I need a customization, however. Because Linux is only an OS kernel rather than an OS, there are many OS options and styles that a user may choose (resulting in far more options and styles than with Apple and M$.) The source for nearly everything is available (proprietary HW drivers being the only typical exception), the scripting options are powerful, and everything you need is in the clear to see.

There is no "Apple of 3D printers" and, in some aspects, I agree that it's a good thing! I've been very happy with my ability to customize Marlin. I still have my 3+ year-old UMO, which has a custom heated bed that supports a variety of interchangeable build surfaces, and a hot end that I also modified. I'm trying to find the time finish machining a Macor PEEK substitute to top 300 C, because I still prefer brass to stainless steel for the hot section. I ditched my short belts too. All of my mods were facilitated by the open design mindedness embodied in the UMO from its inception.

None of the new Ultimaker machines are  compelling to me, because they attempt to take a small step toward "Apple-ness" (superficially, I think) but sometimes deny me the ability to control the machine or work-around the common problems and difficulties associated with 3D printing. Some of the difficulties are associated with printing materials other than PLA, I know, and Ultimaker B.V. is still a very PLA-oriented company. I hardly ever print PLA, because I make strong structural and mechanical parts which will fail, if printed in conventional brittle PLA.

It's been three years since I bought my Ultimaker (and the UMO was quite a "mature" design when I jumped-in) but still don't see any FFF/FDM printers on the market that can ooze molten plastic any better than my old UMO! FFF/FDM hardware and software development has actually been running at a very slow pace, compared to other emerging computer technologies. I think the biggest advances over the last three years have actually been made in the area of printing materials.

Edited by Guest
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well there is always a tradeoff between hackability and ease of use. If you have the time to tinker with the UMO that's great, but others don't so they are ready to give up some freedom for the sake of moving on and geting things done.

The insane amounts of time I pured into my Linux desktop (at the time I used Slackware) - I will never be able to convince myself to do it again. Because it was just for fun and didn't yeld anything useful. Now that time is a premium resource I'd rather use a printer that has a little less features but can reliably do what I ask for.

The skill (or magic) for Ultimaker would be to create something that is powerful enough to please both ends of the spectrum - without compromising the core performance of the printer.

I don't say that what you do is bad - far from it. But if you had little time and still needed strong parts printed at high temps - what would you do? You would buy a printer that's much more expensive, one that already does what you are looking for. So here again, you'd trade off hackability for time (because as stupid as it sounds - with money you can buy "time" that you don't need to spend on modding a printer).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But if you had little time and still needed strong parts printed at high temps - what would you do? You would buy a printer that's much more expensive, one that already does what you are looking for.

 

I would probably not buy a more expensive printer for my business needs, because it would not "pencil-out" in terms of overall expense vs my time. I would either machine the parts myself (mostly prototypes) or send them out for manufacture (machining or rapid injection molding, or even silicone molded urethane sometimes). The UM (either UMO or UM2 or FFF/FDM in general) is right on the edge of being capable of making the kinds of industrial parts and prototypes that I require.

When someone asks me about 3D printers, I tell them the experience is not like printing family vacation photos on an inkjet! I also tell them that it took me more time to learn how to use my UMO effectively than it took me to learn how to run a lathe or a milling machine.

I can certainly understand your experiences with Slackware and your feelings about it too. Although there are more turn-key installation experiences nowadays (Ubuntu being the most popular), I have yet to install a Linux-based OS on any laptop without experiencing at least a few hassles--hassles that the typical Mac or Windows user would not be able to overcome. Desktop and server installations tend to go much more smoothly.

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • Architect Design Contest | People
      The goal of this contest is to design a set of people figurines that could be used in such a project to make an area, office or mall seem populated. 
      Think of different types of people in different environments, like walking people, people standing still, working people, and both men and women.
       
      • 31 replies
    • Taking Advantage of DfAM
      This is a statement that’s often made about AM/3DP. I'll focus on the way DfAM can take advantage of some of the unique capabilities that AM and 3DP have to offer. I personally think that the use of AM/3DP for light-weighting is one of it’s most exciting possibilities and one that could play a key part in the sustainability of design and manufacturing in the future.
        • Like
      • 3 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!