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bob-hepple

Supports designed in Cad an Blue Tape

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Hi All

I'm using S3D but that does not really matter hear in this question. I want a very clean print NO RIM and want to print a channel very cleanly in the picture below lies the Horse in bright Yellow is the main Body and in Orange is a channel I of set the edges by .20 and the face up to the main body has a gap of also .20 would this work as a support???

I also printed for the first time on to Blue Tape as I wanted NO RIM and as the horse is being glued together I wanst bothered about the smooth glass finish. BUT how do you get the print of the bed without snapping the print it was a real pain trying to prise the print off I even re heated the bed to 40....

Any tips with the Blue tape.

5a331e07b66fa_screenshot3.thumb.jpg.1cf19d77195cca503df97d226335e278.jpg

5a331e07b66fa_screenshot3.thumb.jpg.1cf19d77195cca503df97d226335e278.jpg

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If I understand you correctly you have created a support that is similar to what I did here?

medium_feederInstructions.jpg

If so, yes, a 0.2mm gap should work fine. I used 0.15mm no my supports. It can depend a bit on which layer height you use, but I think it'll work for you.

You don't have to use tape to print without a brim. If you have a very clean piece of glass and you're using PLA, you should be able to get that thing to stick. If you find it starts warping you can add a bit of glue (less is more) and try again.

To help with sticking you can level the bed a bit closer to the nozzle. And to get rid of the elephants foot you can put a small chamfer on the edges that are towards the bed to give the plastic some room to expand in.

Oh, and don't re-heat the bed to get things to come off. If anything you want to cool it down instead. I use a very thin and flexible putty knife that I've sharpened to get under my prints to pop them off.

Edited by Guest
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Thanks for the reply, indeed I saw your supports in the feeder and this was in my mind when I drew the Horse, but your supports where a lot thinner than mine and this is where I thought I might come unstuck (no pun)..

I went to the Blue tape because I couldn't get a reliable print first layer is always messy (seriously) don't like the idea of the glue, blue tape worked just could not get the dam thing off.

Thanks.

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Instead of spending several prints learning to be a blue tape expert I strongly suggest you become a "hot glass" expert. You thought you knew what you were doing on glass until you got to this horse. It's possible to get things to stick incredibly well to glass but then pop off when cooled. It's all about the leveling.

both with tape and glass once the bed is level you need to set the distance between the nozzle and glass to determine if the bottom layer is squished or not. If you want dimensional accuracy you want no squishing (or add a chamfer like IRobertI does). The best way to achieve this is while printing the skirt around your horse you adjust the 3 screws. Halt, clean plate, and restart this print several times (maybe 5 times if you are new at this) until your skirt traces are .4mm wide (if .4mm nozzle). Measure with micrometer.

This is only if dimensional accuracy is more important than having the part sitck to the glass. If sticking is more important than move the glass closer to the nozzle by turning the 3 screws the same amount. Don't keep re-running the stupid leveling procedure. That gets you level and it gets you close to the right distance but adjusting based on the skirt trace width is much more accurate.

There's a HUGE difference in how much the part sticks to the glass. About 5X difference between the normal bottom layer height and squished height. This is true for both blue tape and glass. So there's no advantage to go to blue tape.

As far as glue - most people use too much. Put on 1/10 as much glue and spread it around with wet tissue. When done the glue should be invisible.

As far as getting off blue tape - I recommend you rip up the tape off the glass then soak the part in rubbing alcohol for about 1 minute and then the tape comes right off (maybe 4 minutes? It's been a few years). Or compromise, use a very sharp putty knife (sharpened with a file to be as sharp as a steak knife) and don't worry about destroying the blue tape.

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Gr5

Thank you for your advise, Levelling the bed is a real Pain "Literally" Due to my Physical Limitations. BUT I will take on board your recommendations and try, the .40 measurement if sticking is more important "NO RIM". Is there a dimension I could use, say .20?? or is it a case of Trying and see..

I went to the blue tape because I was struggling with the first layer, after I installed the OB and spacer, my first layer has never been the same again. It tends to come out in splurges so some of the first layer is thin and clean and other parts is think. so sticking to glass became a problem/unreliable. After the first layer everything is fine... I'm using the .40 Nozzle from 3DSolex the short profiled one like E3D sell.

http://3dsolex.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Photo-01.03.15-22.19.32-300x300.jpg

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I was struggling with the first layer, after I installed the OB and spacer, my first layer has never been the same again. It tends to come out in splurges so some of the first layer is thin and clean and other parts is think.

Also leveling issue. What you describe sounds like nozzle was too far from glass. It takes about 1 second to test this theory. When it is happening just push up on the bed from below. You can use your nose or chin if you can't use hands.

The height of the olsson block and nozzle versus the original is of course different so you need to relevel after changing that out.

Not having fingers that can turn those 3 leveling screws would really suck. Makes me want to write a leveling procedure just for handicapped people (I forget if you are handicapped or not - I know there's at least one person in england on this list...).

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I made hex Headed nuts 16mm Dia by 5mm thick with a 3mm thread made from Stainless Steel. I use a Ratchet spanner for the adjustment. but its a pain. And yes I am Physically challenged.

I will try your suggestion hear is a sample of my first layer

5a331a3fc4896_Firstlayer.thumb.jpg.39cda89fa51b440298c0874d8b7c2cdb.jpg

and when its gone really think this is the back of the print

5a331a4096a40_Finishedback.thumb.jpg.fc4a9bf635a057fdafa72694c7d11463.jpg

note the deformity

Thanks for the advise will try it.

5a331a3fc4896_Firstlayer.thumb.jpg.39cda89fa51b440298c0874d8b7c2cdb.jpg

5a331a4096a40_Finishedback.thumb.jpg.fc4a9bf635a057fdafa72694c7d11463.jpg

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