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XavierUGent93

Delamination first layer

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Hello

Im using PLA 1.75mm and Repetier for slicing my objects.

My heated bed is: 60°C and my nozzle has a temperature of 185°C.

Everytime i'm trying to print anything the first layer relaeses from the heated bed.

For the first 3 layers I set off the cooling fan, next to the nozzle to make sure the filament is cooling down more slowly.

Even if i reduce the printspeed, the filament still relaeses from the surface of the heated bed.

Anyone who can help me?

Thanks in advance!

Xavier

Edited by Guest

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Hi @XavierUgent93,

Thank you for your post and welcome to the forums.

What kind of 3D printer do you use, an Ultimaker? It is designed to use 2.85mm filaments. If you are destined to use 1.75mm filament on your Ultimaker, you should make some modifications to your machine.

I also think you are refering to warping, instead of delamination. This might make it a little bit easier to search for other solutions too.

If you could let us know what kind of 3D Printer you use that would be helpful! :)

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Are you printing on plain glass? I think 185°C is too cold for good adhesion to the buildplate. For difficult parts, I increase temperature to 220°C for the first layer and then reduce it gradually during second layer to the desired value. Another typical reason for bad bed adhesion is a slightly too large calibrated distance between nozzle and glass.

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Hi SandervG and avogra!

Thank you very much!

At our university we use an ultimaker 2+ without any problems. I was so intrested in 3D printing I build a 3D printer by my own. Kinda like the Prusa I3.

I'm printing on a plain glass with some tape on for a better surface. But i don't know or it's helping.

I have to say that the room, where i'm printing in, is under the roof and kinda warm (25°C). When i'm printing I try to close the windows and doors so there is no ventilation in the room.

Maybe I can start again with calibrating the distance between the nozzle and the glass.

Edited by Guest

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Most likely you leveled with head too far from glass. Squishing the filament more will get you better adhesion. Also make sure the glass is clean. I clean the glass about once per month - just remove it and put in sink with soap and water, dry and re-install. Adding a little glue stick to the glass and spreading with wet tissue and letting that dry will help parts stick even more. But most important is to squish filament into the glass. Try turning the 3 leveling screws and equal amount - try 1/2 rotation CCW to get glass closer to nozzle.

Blue filament is closest to ideal although the yellow example will stick like hell.

skirt.thumb.png.6b55ac68e85d4be60c98ec88f89bf5ca.png

skirt.thumb.png.6b55ac68e85d4be60c98ec88f89bf5ca.png

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I think the best advice @gr5 gave me about bed leveling precisely was to add 4 skirt lines to the print. Then while the printer is making those skirt lines, quickly turn and adjust the bed adjustment knobs as needed to get the desired result. It will seem a little frantic doing so but having done it...I haven't had to adjust the bed in quite some time.

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