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Lukephos

Printing from a point

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This is something that infuriates me since I cant even fix it in Meshmixer. How the hell are you meant to support a print that is printing from a point without it wobbling and eventually falling over? The last two prints have been unprintable because of this. The will have a part that only touches the print bed on its edge or corner and as the layers go up it wobbles more and more making it print worse then eventually it falls and ruins the print. This is especially impossible when that point is in the air since it has to rely on tiny support beams. Is there any way to give it support without coating everything in support material by turning the overhang angle really low? Also no rotating the print isn't a very viable solution in both of my cases. I would love this to be a feature, having an extra support radios around small connections to prevent wobbling and falling but who knows.

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A picture would be helpful. Usually you can rotate it so that 3 points touch the plate.

Anyway, I almost always create my own supports in CAD instead of using a slicer. However if you aren't the designer then I recommend meshmixer. It's free. Here's an article about using it for support:

http://www.extrudable.me/2013/12/28/meshmixer-2-0-best-newcomer-in-a-supporting-role/

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Somethings just are not very printable. Every manufacturing process has its limitations.

Have you tried adding "helper disks"? You can add them to a print right in the slicer software. The slicer then merges the objects and prints them as one part. Then you have to cut them off with a sharp knife or clippers. You can also use these on corners to help keep parts from warping off the bed.

[print=3440][/print]

I was pretty surprised that this actually worked! We almost didn't try it because it didn't fit in the printer in a normal way. We had to stand this up on just one edge and add a bunch of helper discs.

You could also try cutting the model in half and putting the two cut faces on the bed.

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/9712-cutting-up-and-printing-model-with-meshmixer-to-avoid-overhangs

 

https://blog.adafruit.com/2014/07/31/split-large-designs-into-printable-parts/

Edited by Guest

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Let's say I was printing this model for example: https://www.myminifactory.com/object/pichu-figure-23653

It has a flat base but also has its tail only touching by its point, and when I print it, it wobbles then falls. I tried to use meshmixer to add some support but I cant put it that low on the tail and it always brakes horribly when I try add it, most times when I try drag it straight downwards it shoots off to the background and looks fine till I turn my view to see it. This makes it impossible to just ass a bit of support of the tail. Also doesn't it print stuck to it instead of coming off easy like a support? I've not seen how it prints but it looks quite aqward.

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First of all, that tail does look tricky and fragile. I downloaded the STL. The tail in the picture does NOT match the tail in the STL file.

5a3325670ae65_pichu1.JPG.5a6784d66a487ae42f7c15577cd2f5ad.JPG

5a33256725f1d_pichu2.thumb.JPG.5f941f323a2746dd527276ca463425b4.JPG

The tail really does only touch the bed at a point. So much so that S3D does see enough geometry there to print anything until the third layer! And I have it set on 0.1mm layer height

5a33256748ec3_pichu3.thumb.JPG.98f8949eb6f060894ef1755d23bd8e2e.JPG First Layer = no tail contact

So in addition to it having a very small base, it also no bed adhesion.

Trick 1: Bury the model in the print bed. This will give the tail a much broader base to start with and one that actually has a first layer. The deeper the better (up to a point).

5a3325694c7f2_pichu13.JPG.e59b9e0c64df82c6b7e4de610b5d112d.JPG

5a3325695bc53_pichu14.JPG.be1b0b035c4cea6cac20489e45c3b340.JPG

Trick 2: Add a helper disk. This gives the tail broader base and connects it to the rest of the base of the model. Increasing the thickness of the helper disk will give the tail an even better chance.

5a33256764087_pichu4.thumb.JPG.b4f1ddf71ae2b3ac7b6a8d642005b427.JPG

5a33256783682_pichu5.JPG.c2803ab178e58718d10e4a7e24b3344f.JPG

5a332567b2fa5_pichu6.thumb.JPG.5daf16a7027e2c59d5159fd87d4ddebb.JPG

5a332567e96d3_pichu8.JPG.993d80067565641e958ad8d23292b2a9.JPG

5a332567d517b_pichu7.JPG.4c3ecc08481ac68881164dd49eabafed.JPG

Trick 3: The overhang of the tail directly around its base doesn't need support material, but you can manually add supports in S3D. These could act as a cage to keep the tail from tipping over.

5a3325681a498_pichu9.thumb.JPG.5670b4e56523f4dbe0a62605974857fd.JPG

Trick 4: This might be cheating too much. Flip a help disk on its side and position it under the tail. Now the tail is connected to the rest of the model from the ground up.

5a33256835500_pichu10.JPG.064b69b9967efd88f4f2038e0a4b7df2.JPG

5a33256921151_pichu11.thumb.JPG.c6c0f311eed55329a50ac843415bf86e.JPG

5a332569360e2_pichu12.thumb.JPG.dd4c28b6f3b8e6609d51dbdcb7df18c4.JPG

Good luck.

5a3325670ae65_pichu1.JPG.5a6784d66a487ae42f7c15577cd2f5ad.JPG

5a33256725f1d_pichu2.thumb.JPG.5f941f323a2746dd527276ca463425b4.JPG

5a33256748ec3_pichu3.thumb.JPG.98f8949eb6f060894ef1755d23bd8e2e.JPG

5a3325694c7f2_pichu13.JPG.e59b9e0c64df82c6b7e4de610b5d112d.JPG

5a3325695bc53_pichu14.JPG.be1b0b035c4cea6cac20489e45c3b340.JPG

5a33256764087_pichu4.thumb.JPG.b4f1ddf71ae2b3ac7b6a8d642005b427.JPG

5a33256783682_pichu5.JPG.c2803ab178e58718d10e4a7e24b3344f.JPG

5a332567b2fa5_pichu6.thumb.JPG.5daf16a7027e2c59d5159fd87d4ddebb.JPG

5a332567e96d3_pichu8.JPG.993d80067565641e958ad8d23292b2a9.JPG

5a332567d517b_pichu7.JPG.4c3ecc08481ac68881164dd49eabafed.JPG

5a3325681a498_pichu9.thumb.JPG.5670b4e56523f4dbe0a62605974857fd.JPG

5a33256835500_pichu10.JPG.064b69b9967efd88f4f2038e0a4b7df2.JPG

5a33256921151_pichu11.thumb.JPG.c6c0f311eed55329a50ac843415bf86e.JPG

5a332569360e2_pichu12.thumb.JPG.dd4c28b6f3b8e6609d51dbdcb7df18c4.JPG

Edited by Guest
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That, was... really in depth and well explained. I didnt even see that it didnt touch the plate since I had it set to print at 0.1mm. The solutions all make different compromises and theres enough solutions to fit most situations. The cage to hold it is what I was looking for when asking the question and I wasnt able to do it in Cura, I havent heard of S3D before and should look into it. Thanks for all the info.

You know what sucks though? This was for a gift and so I was pressed for time. I printed it with 30 degree overhang. SO MUCH SUPPORT TO REMOVE. It was HORRIBLE. It had so many contact points it took forever to take off. And getting it from out between the legs, nightmare inducting. My finger looks like I rubbed it in metal filings, so painful..... I wish I saw the post first.

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The new 2.4 BETA of Cura allows you to create a "cage" now by using the experimental "Support Mesh" feature.

support_mesh_01.thumb.PNG.9ea9b398f3fde266772240399bb7333a.PNG

support_mesh_02.thumb.PNG.4b9d2922a78ef4d19ff4988e0cc5b7e2.PNG

This was just a quick and dirty example, you can tweak the support settings as well.

support_mesh_01.thumb.PNG.9ea9b398f3fde266772240399bb7333a.PNG

support_mesh_02.thumb.PNG.4b9d2922a78ef4d19ff4988e0cc5b7e2.PNG

Edited by Guest
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You could split the objects in parts and glue it or design clipon parts. Also 45degree overhang is the maximum needed and with good cooling you should be able to do 60 degrees.

Edited by Guest

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