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Since there's no official solution yet from Ultimaker, here's my solution for an UM 3 door I'd like to share. It is opened / closed by lifting ~5mm and pulling the bottom handle. The top handles have a grabbing mechanism and centers the door:

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Attention: the top handle / clamping mechanism needs to be sized and adjusted well, to prevent collision with the print head.

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If you want to be able to use the complete bedsize the head will stick some 5mm out off the front... so a door 5mm offset from the front panel would be ideal.

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Here are 2 versions of a front cover for um3 where there is an area that sticks out so the head doesn't hit the front door.

bender.thumb.PNG.73600a80c125326a3bde468a3d1034ad.PNG

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Thanks for your replies.

Are you sure the door is hit? It looks like it's on the edge of hitting it, but did not notice it so far... I checked when designing the door, but to be honest, I also take out the door to catch the pre-priming dropping to prevent it from being dragged to the print area.

Otherwise, I'd opt to give Ultimaker at least a suggestion to adjust the priming position. Is that prime position hard-coded in firmware??? It's quite silly otherwise to have the head stick out per default that much during the priming.

The design is available in Onshape publicly, but since there's debate on the safety of this design, I'd not post a direct link yet (otherwise PM me).

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You can push the head around by hand when the printer is off or when you first power it on but before you start a print. Push it all the way to the front. It sticks out. At least it does on my UM3.

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You can push the head around by hand when the printer is off or when you first power it on but before you start a print.  Push it all the way to the front.  It sticks out.  At least it does on my UM3.

 

Ah, ok, that's what you mean. Yes, for my system as well it's possible to move the print head further than the default prime position. Does this mean that it's possible with default settings to protrude the door, or are custom settings needed in order to hit it? [edit: I see ultiajan already answered this question]

Edited by Guest

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Nice work! Do you have a parts list or some detailed instructions?

 

For the adventurous (use at own risk), here it is: http://catch22.eu/3dprinting/u3door/

Detailed instructions: here are some I could think of right now. Tricky part is finding the correct position to drill holes in the door itself (not too low, otherwise the extruder hits the clamps). There needs to be about 5mm play in z-direction between bottom clamps and top clamps, although the latches have slotted holes which aids well enough in drill hole accuracy I think. Best way to find the positions is to drill at least holes for the bottom and mount the bottom clamp, then find the correct position for the top clamps. The top clamps have sort of a centering mechanism, so both X and Z positions for the holes do matter. My suggestion for door material is to take something that can withstand some temperatures (mine is from 4mm polysterene, which can handle 75C, although I'd rather go a bit thicker than 4mm to give it some more rigidity). The clamps are made for M4 size screws, and ABS of course. Take also care for the remarks below/above using maximum possible build volume.

Please let me know if the stl files are correct (I had to edit them for general usage by giving them the correct orientation).

Edited by Guest
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Cool! Now let's see if some hybrid of the 3 designs will pop-up :)

Update here from my door: it's still a pleasure to work with, I did not have to adjust the prime positions or anything.

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20170423_175301.thumb.jpg.3df71156d92f30bc1391450e2e46c555.jpg

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Ultimaker front cover (possible door)

Can you see it ?

Very hard to see.

Ok.

Try to put in an A3 laminator an pouch without paper.

Any complicated problem has always a simple solution.

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I fashioned this door originally for my UM2 Ext. Modified the hinges for my UM3 Ext. Print head does not come in contact with the door in normal use.

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Putting the hinge pivots at the outer corner of the printer allows the door to swing open completely against the printer and out of the way.

Hinges and handle are PLA, as is the control knob with a crank for improved ergonomics. Ultimaker Robot on a keychain to keep track of my USB drive.

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That looks cool!! I wonder how the hinges are helt in their position. Looks like sort of a clamping mechanism? Does that work well enough to keep them in position?

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That looks cool!! I wonder how the hinges are helt in their position. Looks like sort of a clamping mechanism? Does that work well enough to keep them in position?

The hinge pins wrap around the front panel and are secured by a small screw into the outside panel of the printer.

5a333a94215be_HingePin.thumb.JPG.5abaa67bd3ca7159e45cf0a208ad104a.JPG

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The hinge pins wrap around the front panel and are secured by a small screw into the outside panel of the printer.

Ah, so I guess replacement screws which are longer than the original screws that are already there? Again, very nice! Easier to mount as well compared to my design. Would you be willing to share your design?

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The original files for the hinge and handle were available on Thingiverse:

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:767741

The hinge pivots needed to be modified to suit the narrower front bezel of the UM3 vs the UM2 for which it was originally designed. I'm happy to share my modified files if you have no means of editing the original STL files. Is there a means to do so via this site, or do I need to put them in the cloud via DropBox?

BTW, I printed all of the files standing on edge, not laying flat. Had to sink them into the build plate as I recall (negative Z location). No brim was necessary.

I used .090 LEXAN Poly carbonate sheet instead of Plexiglas. Tougher, more stable, clearer and much less prone to scratching.

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Instead of putting the STL files on drop box please put them on youmagine as dropbox is probably only temporary and you may be tempted to delete the STL out of your dropbox account within the next 10 or 20 years. People (not many but still) 10 years from now will still be interested in this.

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