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kmanstudios

Large Format printer larger than current models

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Just a question about any plans to make a truly large format printer such as along the lines of a build area about (X) 16 inches x (Y) 16 inches by (Z) 24 inches? For future use I am looking at something that will require a large build area for parts that require printing in one large area for structural integrity.

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I've done the same research, narrowing it down to the Raise3D and the gcreate gMax.

The Raise3D has some issues if you want to use materials besides PLA or ABS as there isn't a way to control the fan speed. The Facebook group has some good posts about modifications others have made.

The gcreate gMax is very interesting but I am not a fan of moving build plates.

I hope Ultimaker has something in the works!

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That's the only thing killing the gMax as well for me. I have limited space (Yay small Brooklyn apartments....I actually sleep in the same room as the printer.) and the moving build plate is a problem, especially if you get more than one.

Ultimaker has a very nice ecosystem. I am hoping they have something on the burner for this. That, or buy one and then adapt it and that would be a real pain........

The good thing about sleeping in the room with the printer, is that I am learning the sounds like a new parent....and being a grandfather, well, I know what that is like! LOL

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Were you at the Ultimaker 3 release in Brooklyn?  Ultimaker invited me down, beautiful city...quite different from my house here in Maine.  My printers quietly churn away in the basement where the temperature stays around 61-63 degrees (F) and low humidity

 

Nopers....I didn't get my hands on one until mid January and up to that time I was in research/study land. That and digging out models I had made over the years to use in testing.

Brooklyn can be nice. But I am a country boy at heart and all this city is stifling. My apartment is in the basement and it does help, but is not well insulated and can vary with the humidity and temp.

I am jealous LOL

But, even with the hiccups, I am really impressed with the machine. If you knew how hard I can be on machinery when I am learning it, well, you would know that it is a robust machine and I can trace most of my difficulties in the 'user error' area. :p

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I am really impressed with my Ultimaker 2+, so much so I am selling off my Ultimaker Original. I just don't need to tinker as hard with the UM2+ for a great print. (Plus I am always doubting my building skillset when bad prints happen!)

The Ultimaker 3 is a very, very nice printer. On my wish list for a while.

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I am really impressed with my Ultimaker 2+, so much so I am selling off my Ultimaker Original.  I just don't need to tinker as hard with the UM2+ for a great print.  (Plus I am always doubting my building skillset when bad prints happen!)

The Ultimaker 3 is a very, very nice printer.  On my wish list for a while.

 

It is coming into its own with the extras now becoming available. Things like different core sizes and such.

It is a great machine to learn on as it is easier to define user error vs software/hardware error. That and the built in ecosystem.

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LePaul...LePaul...LePaul....

Sigh...now I have to go look that stuff too!! LOL

I am very curious about these types of machines as I gain understanding and hearing this info from you guys is very helpful, such as giving me new things to look up to know what you are talking about.

I have been doing mostly materials sciences and trying a bunch of filaments out, so most tech I have learned is very specific to the UM3+.

It be good to branch out a bit :)

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Sorry but I not know. The A4 was circa 3,500 GBP (before Brexit of course 8))but the A2 is considerably upgraded and is of course bigger. Their stuff is all CNC milled and turned but if you are wanting to run a business with it, apart from the glass, fans and belts, it is all steel and alloys with attached longevity and reliability and worth the investment. Only suitable for wealthy hobbyists :)

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Sorry but I not know. The A4 was circa 3,500 GBP (before Brexit of course 8))but the A2 is considerably upgraded and is of course bigger. Their stuff is all CNC milled and turned but if you are wanting to run a business with it, apart from the glass, fans and belts, it is all steel and alloys with attached longevity and reliability and worth the investment. Only suitable for wealthy hobbyists :)

That makes sense. I am just leery when it is a 'quote request' Vs. Just telling the price with options.

I do like that it is enclosed very much and the ability to have multiple nozzles are nice. But, as I am just starting out, I am hoping by the time I get around to looking at the large format printers, Ultimaker will have something comparable size-wise. But that is sweet looking.

And big!!

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While the research is still on, there are already some good large format 3D printers which are capable of printing large scale 3D objects.

I looked at a lot of those when I was researching last year. What held me back was the lack of enclosure and the print bed moved back and forth creating a larger foot print.

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I opted to experiment and bought a Creality CR-10 (300 x 300 x 400). They are about what you would expect from a cheap, Chinese 3D printer.

Out of the box, once you have done some calibration, they can print very good resolution and large. And if you just want to print with PLA, that's fine.

However if you want to get into ABS, PETG or anything else, you're looking at upgrades. Depending on your comfort level, there's a lot you can do. Many build their own enclosures, replace the print head with an E3Dv6, upgrade the extruder to a metal one, add filament run out sensors and auto bed leveling. Again, I emphasize, these are things that require you to be a tinkerer. There's a lot of work to be done in firmware, insulating the heated bed (or replacing), obtaining flatter glass and so on.

While the cost is roughly $649 for a CR-10S, after you do all those upgrades, you have a fair sum invested. Yet, it is still less than something like a Raise3D N2 Plus, a completely assembled, tested and ready to go out-of-the-box for $3499.

Ultimately it depends on the buyers comfort level. Like our beloved Ultimakers, you open, unbox, set up and are set to go print! The price equals convenience!

I really wish Ultimaker made a large scale printer since things like the print head/hot end/ Olsson Block would really be a big benefit. Especially since the people in my type of hobby (movie props) use a lot of different filament types. The Ultimaker 2/3 print head just works with ease with so many different types.

My 2 cents

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