Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
nzo

Advice wanted: how to model and print 2 sails and half a boat hull.

Recommended Posts

[print=37549][/print]

Hi All,

OUTLINE:

I'd like to use my UM2+ to print two sails and "half a boat hull". This is intended for an art project that would use simplified versions of small boat sails bellied-out with wind, i.e. a jib and a mainsail. I imagine the sails would be printed flat on the printbed with the wind-belly facing up. The curves are not severe - for the jib (foresail) maybe 1/2" from printbed to the curve's highest point, and for the mainsail about 1/4" from bed to highest point.

The boat hull would be sliced in half vertically and the cut face would sit flat on the print bed.

RESULT:

After printing, the sails and hull would form a montage glued to a non-printed hardboard backing - like a 3-D picture in a frame that could be hung on a wall.

I'd be using white PLA that could be smoothed and painted.

It works in my head :)

Does anyone have any tips on how I can model the sails without having to be a mathematical genius? I have several freebie software design progs (OpenScad, Blender, Meshmixer).

Thank you!

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi NZO,

I think what you want is possible as you say.

For the printing of the sails, i don;t think it wil matter if the belly faces up or downwards for the printer. Keep however in mind that the facing down part, wil be less prety due to the support structure. Just choose the side you would like to be nicest to be top.

For the thicknes, personally i would recomen making it around 3mm thick, probably it could be thinner, but with this thicknes, i think it will be quite rigid, and doesn't brakes easily.

In the designing, I unfortunately only have experience in (student) version of non-free CAD programms. I now it is quite easy to make them in Solidworks/Rhino orso.

Perhaps you could check if there are any existing sails on existing things like: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:923580

And if it would be able to scale in x-y-z directins in Cura, to get you're dimensions?

(If you're really at wits i could help you design it) ;)

Kinds/regards,

Ewoud

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone have any tips on how I can model the sails without having to be a mathematical genius? I have several freebie software design progs (OpenScad, Blender, Meshmixer).

CAD programs can create a solid by specifying a series of cross sections. This would be the easiest way. Usually this function is called "loft" or "sweep". I don't know, if blender or OpenScad provide such a function, but it's easy done with FreeCAD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about printing only the frame of the sails, and filling in the sail with real tissue? If you use modern tissue like used in sports shirts (thin and a bit shiny), this would probably look the most realistic. If you want it to get a fixed shape, you could wet it with dilluted wood glue or so, set a powerfull fan to it, and let that dry. Then you could redo it if required by wetting again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Announcements

  • Our picks

    • Architect Design Contest | Vehicles.
      We're open for entries! - Design and submit your 3D designs of architectural entourage - vehicles - for a chance to win a large filament pack. Presenting an idea, an architectural design or something as big as an urban project isn't easy. A scaled model can really help to get your idea across.
        • Like
      • 14 replies
    • What The DfAM?
      I'm Steve Cox, an experienced engineer familiar with 3D printing. I wanted to share some DfAM guidelines with this community to help and make stronger parts.
      I'm also an Autodesk Certified Instructor for Fusion 360, so many of the images in ...
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 18 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!