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chickozz

Vase mode - huge spiral around my print

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Hey printerfriends! :)

I'm from Germany and new to this forum.

I'm having a strange issue printing a lampshade in vasemode/spiralize (Cura 2.5.0), always got a HUGE Spiral around. (printer CR10)

At this time I've printed it three times. (its always the same spiral but getting from print to print less heavy and flat/smaller?!)(the 1cm big wobbles, its a perfect spiral around from bottom to top.)

First Print:

Retraction on, Fans on, Zhop on, layerhigh 0.2mm, wallthickness 0.4 (nozzle is 0.4)

30mm/s printspeed

-> z-seam and a huge spiral around the whole print (startet at 5cm)

22281762_1514806391940929_1859230456863890189_n.jpg

Second Print:

retraction off, fans off, zhop off, layerhigh 0.2, wallthickness 0.4 , 70mm/s

-> no seam, but also a spiral around, this time the spiral startet later (startet at 8-10cm)

Third Print:

retraction off, zhop off, fans off, layerhigh 0.2, wallthickness 0.7, 70mm/s

-> looked great but turned out the same, spiral startet waaay later (at 15cm)

(first at the back -> newest in the front)

IMG_20171012_111624.jpg

Now I have one lampshade left, because I needed 4 of them mofos :p

First we thought the spiral comes from the fans, but fans off turned out the same :/

Thicker walls looked good at the beginning but the spiral started later.

Maybe its because the print is so huge (290mm width) and the weight pushes down?

Or the Filament is to warm+weight = spiral? maybe 30% fan speed on?!

Every other print before turned out great, no problems.

Btw. this is the first time I printed something in Vase mode.

any Ideas?

Greetz

Edited by Guest

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Okay this is confusing because "vase mode" in cura used to be called "spiralize" but you are talking about that large (1cm?) spiral I think.

I've never seen that. Could it be some vibration - a harmonic vibration from your bed moving back and forth? Try lowering the speed or maybe just the acceleration.

Probably just the acceleration - I don't know what kind of printer that is but it probably has Marlin which allows you to specify the acceleration with a gcode. Look at what it is currently and cut the acceleration by a factor of 4X. It shouldn't slow down the print too much.

Another fix might be to add interior supports to connect one side of the print to the other occasionally that are later removed. Or exterior. But you would have to disable vase mode.

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I don't know the CR10 but have you tried using printrun/pronterface to control it? I assume your printer has a USB?

Software is free here:

http://koti.kapsi.fi/~kliment/printrun/

When you connect to the printer, if it is Marlin or similar it should list out all the settings including the acceleration. Make a note of it and then cut the acceleration down severely - maybe by 5X. Here is the gcode you can type into printrun to set acceleration (again assuming marlin - when you connect with printrun it should tell you if it is running sprinter or marlin or something else)

gcodes explained here for most firmwares which covers 99% of printers out there:

http://reprap.org/wiki/G-code

M204 S300 ; 300mm/sec/sec - very slow - UM uses 5000, most printers around 1000

Print with this and you will hear the difference. Just insert the command early in your job or do:

M500

To save this setting permanently (otherwise it gets reset to defaults on power cycle).

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This looks a bit like when you manually extrude silicone paste in a circle: it sags, and it pulls the previous layers sideways due to its own unstability and flexibility.

Could that be here too? Maybe: temperature too high, walls to thin, material too flexible (for the size of the object), or some sort of mechanical wobble in the model due to inertia or resonance?

If I had to print it, I would print it as slow and cool as possible. With thick walls. And with a layer height of only 0.1mm: a thicker layer height needs more time to cool, and might easier be pulled sideways than a thinner layer, I think. But this is a guess.

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