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Cura 3: Object shadow making it unprintable

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Wanted to print a model but Cura projects some kind of shadow and indicates it unprintable (won't fit). Simplify3D has no such reservations.

5a33404e56d17_ScreenShot2017-10-21at11_08_04.thumb.png.0c3a488cafafb80bdab86334d19eb90d.png

I managed to rotate it in such a way that the shadow would also fit on the build plate (in a corner, shadow going diagonally) and then looked at the layer view. No travels or any kind of printing going on beyond the model.

If it's like a stray piece of model that far out, isn't it possible to somehow detect and repair that?

5a33404e56d17_ScreenShot2017-10-21at11_08_04.thumb.png.0c3a488cafafb80bdab86334d19eb90d.png

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That is not a shadow, It is some far off piece of geometry that Cura projects straight down to show full model size.

Have you looked at the model itself in a package to see if it has errant geometry that Cura can detect that Slicer does not?

I would be happy to take a look at it if you can supply a link to it.

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Yes, it's what I also suspect, hence the remark at the end.

What is annoying is that Cura can obviously detect that the piece "out there" is nothing it should print, as the slicing indicates once you get it into an orientation that "fits".

Older versions used to have detection and repair routines for things like that.

This is the model in question btw.

Edited by Guest

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Yes, it's what I also suspect, hence the remark at the end.

What is annoying is that Cura can obviously detect that the piece "out there" is nothing it should print, as the slicing indicates once you get it into an orientation that "fits".

Older versions used to have detection and repair routines for things like that.

This is the model in question btw.

I got the file. I will check it quickly between animating sequences.

But, I do not think that Cura fixed and eliminated problems like this. If there is errant geometry to be removed, it would not know what parts to remove. As Cura advances, and usually software in general, it becomes less tolerant of faults. Less sloppy if you will.

That is why Dim3nsioneer's comment is so important. There is a lot of crap models out there that used to fly under the radar in the earlier days. But as the industry matures and the software becomes more capable, it is of growing importance for users to actually become, at least a bit, familiar with how to operate on their models. That is why I like to look at the files giving people trouble. It is a way to help them understand what is wrong for when they start to look at files themselves.

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Yes, it's what I also suspect, hence the remark at the end.

What is annoying is that Cura can obviously detect that the piece "out there" is nothing it should print, as the slicing indicates once you get it into an orientation that "fits".

Older versions used to have detection and repair routines for things like that.

This is the model in question btw.

I got the file. I will check it quickly between animating sequences.

But, I do not think that Cura fixed and eliminated problems like this. If there is errant geometry to be removed, it would not know what parts to remove. As Cura advances, and usually software in general, it becomes less tolerant of faults. Less sloppy if you will.

That is why Dim3nsioneer's comment is so important. There are a lot of crap models out there that used to fly under the radar in the earlier days. But as the industry matures and the software becomes more capable, it is of growing importance for users to actually become, at least a bit, familiar with how to operate on their models. That is why I like to look at the files giving people trouble. It is a way to help them understand what is wrong for when they start to look at files themselves.

Edited by Guest

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Here's what freecad shows, there appears to be a couple of rogue points. Also, freecad reports lots of other problems with that model as you can see on the right:

Screenshot_2017-10-22_11-21-57.png?raw=1

There you go :)Too many people are depending on sloppy software these days and then get P.O.'d when the sophisticated/accurate software does not allow it.

There are too many free and easy software solutions out there that can perform these checks and allow editing to create robust models. At the risk of sounding like the grumpy old man here, there is no excuse for not learning how things really work. Most of this stuff can be free and is easy to learn nowadays.

Edited by Guest

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