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ripacheco

minimal wall width part

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Cura 3.2 Macintosh

STL file generated by OnShape

I am a beginner. So forgive me if this is a totally stupid question.

I'm trying to design parts for 3D printing.

I am starting with a simple cylinder with a wall thickness of exactly 0.4mm.

When I attempt to generate g-code in Cura. It ignores most of the wall.

I been trying increasing the thickness of the wall in CAD... if I set the wall thickness to 0.41mm (in CAD) Cura goes around the edge twice!

Naturally there is something that is not correct.

My designs require the walls to be as thin as possible I cannot make the cylinder a solid because eventually it will have structural elements inside.

Using "Print thin walls doesn't seem to help"

 

Lab01 - 0.40.stl

Lab01 - 0.40 - 06.jpeg

Edited by ripacheco

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I deleted your other post - they seemed identical.

 

As you discovered, yes you can also decrease the nozzle size.  A 0.4 nozzle will typically print just as well (actually maybe better) at 0.35mm line width and will even print decently down to about 0.3mm.

 

Cura just doesn't do single wall width - it only prints loops.  So it's always going to go over the same spot twice - sorry about that.

 

There is one trick you can do though - you can model your part for example as a solid cylinder and tell cura to print 0% infill.  You can also disable top and/or bottom infill.  This trick works with slightly more complicated shapes than a cylinder but at some point you have to go back and model the wall thickness in cad (for example if you want holes in your part other than at the top and/or bottom.

 

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Also what kind of printer do you have?  You can go with smaller nozzles.  I sell 0.25mm and 0.15 and even 0.1mm nozzles for many different printer types including all the Ultimaker printers.

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9 minutes ago, gr5 said:

Also what kind of printer do you have?  You can go with smaller nozzles.  I sell 0.25mm and 0.15 and even 0.1mm nozzles for many different printer types including all the Ultimaker printers.

The problem is not buying a new nozzle. is to get Cura to properly generate proper g-code given an STL with vertical walls exactly 0.4mm thick.

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5 hours ago, ripacheco said:

The problem is not buying a new nozzle. is to get Cura to properly generate proper g-code given an STL with vertical walls exactly 0.4mm thick.

 

Great, if you cannot make the model solid, do what @gr5 suggested first.

Set the line width in Cura to 0.25mm or lower and you will get 0.4mm walls (made of two lines).

CuraEngine always generates one (outer) line per shell, that's just how it is designed.

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5 hours ago, tinkergnome said:

 

Great, if you cannot make the model solid, do what @gr5 suggested first.

Set the line width in Cura to 0.25mm or lower and you will get 0.4mm walls (made of two lines).

CuraEngine always generates one (outer) line per shell, that's just how it is designed.

Changing the Line width to 0.25mm didn't help. Even using "thing walls" didn't help.

Only way I have gotten this properly render g-code is by changing the nozzle width.

 

Untitled1.png

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huh, I have never had that issue. It has always worked for me to just adjust line width. I have been experimenting with this and been pleased with the results so far. I am surprised it did not work.

 

May I play with your model to see if I can get it to work?

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There's a nozzle width parameter?  It's not visible for the UM3 printer.  It must be cr10 thing.  You only changed *one* of the line widths to 0.25.  There's 3 or 4 of them.  You have to change them all.

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I've mentioned this before - nozzle size is in printer definition. I make five copies of my printer each with a different nozzle so I can switch rapidly... It shows up in file names which is great, but is a pain.

 

You can change line width as well (one of the first settings - under quality I think?).

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2 minutes ago, AbeFM said:

I've mentioned this before - nozzle size is in printer definition. I make five copies of my printer each with a different nozzle so I can switch rapidly... It shows up in file names which is great, but is a pain.

 

You can change line width as well (one of the first settings - under quality I think?).

Do you use the multiple nozzle definitions to handle thin wall issues? or to deal with actual different nozzles in the printer? or both.

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On 2/12/2018 at 1:54 PM, kmanstudios said:

huh, I have never had that issue. It has always worked for me to just adjust line width. I have been experimenting with this and been pleased with the results so far. I am surprised it did not work.

 

May I play with your model to see if I can get it to work?

Certainly...
The STL is a simple cylinder with a very thin wall (0.4mm) the cylinder cannot be made a solid because it is going to have structure inside.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lgd7PwYpTcdprecXf9WZaJeVO2eejMgQ/view?usp=sharing

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FYI, unlike many other forums, you can upload small files (including stl) directly to your post.

 

I use the definitions for changing nozzles. I'm looking forward to playing with line width. Other slicers print bigger than the nozzle - 0.48 is typical for a 0.4 nozzle. Interesting here it's recommended to go smallEr, I might try.

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