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Nielski55

warping/ curling SIDES

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Hi,

latly when i am printing models with a slight overhang, the sides of the model become verry messy and seem to sorta colaps.

when this overhang is less, i have absolutly no problem at all. it almost looks like over extrusion but this seemed kinda weird to me since the other prints printed fine.

I also tested allreay if my extruder was calibrated correctly and it was.

I included 3 pictures of failing parts and 2 of one that works perfectly fine. 

Has anyone a idea what the problem and solution may be?

 

 

thanks

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I print with 1,75mm PLA, a fan speed of 100% after the first layer and i hade a raft as build plate adhesion. Since the surface touching the bed is quite small in contrast to the rest of the moddel. I also tried a brim.

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When printing overhangs, the material tends to partially sag (since half of the trace is printed in the air), and it tends to curl up when cooling (since there is nothing below to hold it down). Then the nozzle bumps into these curled up edges. All these effects mess up the sides.

 

Possible solutions you could experiment with: print as cool as possible, so it melts less. And print in thicker layers, for example 0.3mm instead of 0.1mm, if the model allows it: this may have a big effect. Place a desktop fan at low settings in front of the printer for additional cooling.

 

Try this on a little test print, so you don't waste too much material and time, until you get the best results.

 

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On 9/5/2018 at 6:11 PM, geert_2 said:

When printing overhangs, the material tends to partially sag (since half of the trace is printed in the air), and it tends to curl up when cooling (since there is nothing below to hold it down). Then the nozzle bumps into these curled up edges. All these effects mess up the sides.

 

Possible solutions you could experiment with: print as cool as possible, so it melts less. And print in thicker layers, for example 0.3mm instead of 0.1mm, if the model allows it: this may have a big effect. Place a desktop fan at low settings in front of the printer for additional cooling.

 

Try this on a little test print, so you don't waste too much material and time, until you get the best results.

 

thanks for the tips! i printed the model at 0.2mm and left the dors of my printer case open so it would be cooler in there. that did the trick and the print came out fine

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