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andwew

Colorfabb Bronze Fill Feeder Grind

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Hi all-

I'm sure many of you have recently got the bronze fill from Colorfabb. I've been trying to do some prints with it but it keeps getting grinded up and then stops extruding.

I noticed is much softer than the standard PLA... I get a decent few layers before it starts grinding and then stops extruding all together. I've adjusted the temperature raised it up to 240 and I've adjust the tension screw, but nothing seems to keep it from eventually getting ground up.

All my settings are pretty standard and my other PLA materials print perfectly.

I know this is very specific, but i wanted to see if anyone else is having this problem with this specific material. Maybe colorfabb can chime in?

I've already gone through half a spool of failed prints. Looking forward to just getting a nice print with this cool material.

 

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I did a one hour print last night with out a problem.

Machine Firmament Settings.

temp: 210

Build plate temp: 55

Flow: 104%

Layer height was 0.1

Cool. Thanks, Gothampixel... -Brooklyn dudes with UM2s :cool:

I'll try again... idk what it could be. I'm think it has to do with the tension spring. Is yours at the tightest setting?

Ugh, i hope it works.

 

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Profepaco- according to colorfabb: "Depending on your set-up, 3d printer and slice software, you might see that bronzeFill needs a bit more flow compared to your normal PLA settings. Most plastics will show die swell when coming out of the nozzle tip, this is counteracted with specific slicer settings. Since bronzeFill doesn’t show a die swell such as PLA you might need to increase flow rate a bit, 4-8% was perfect for our UM2. UM original did not need any adjustments."

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I haven't changed the tension spring on my U2 so I'm not even sure what it's set to.

 

setting recommended from ColorFabb's Site:

BronzeFill

 

Adviced 3d printing temperature:

195-220C*

Adviced 3d print speed:

40 - 100 mm/s

Advised Heated bed (if you have one, not strictly necessary)

50-60C

 

TIP! Depending on your set-up, 3d printer and slice software, you might see that bronzeFill needs a bit more flow compared to your normal PLA settings. Most plastics will show die swell when coming out of the nozzle tip, this is counteracted with specific slicer settings. Since bronzeFill doesn’t show a die swell such as PLA you might need to increase flow rate a bit, 4-8% was perfect for our UM2. UM original did not need any adjustments.

 

TIP! Sanding and polishing your parts will make the bronze particles shine. Start sanding with grit 120-180 and make sure all the printed lines vanish. You’ll notice that because bronzeFill is easy to sand down, careful you won’t loose too much detail. Then start working your way up by following with grit 240-320 and finishing off with grit 600 - or higher. Finally we used a clean soft cloth and some copper polish to really get all of the shine out of the bronze particles.

 

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If my filament was grinding I would try printing slower. Try 50% of what you had been printing. Also, posters above who have printed bronze successfully and unsuccessfully: what speed did you print at?

I also I would consider loosening or tightening the tension on the feeder. Or buy a mk8 feeder sleeve.

 

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Hey guys-

So i got an hour long print to work. I was printing around 30mm/s then down to 20... But when I put it went to the recommended 40 it printed fine.

Seems weird to me that the material is less likely to jam the faster it prints. Does that make sense?

I keep the temperature higher around 220 and my layer thickness around .08.

A little nervous that this material is so fickle, but the prints that came out are really great. This is a game changer for sure.

I'm hoping to work up to 30 hour prints with this stuff, so hopefully no more problems in the future. I'll try to keep everyone updated with new things i find. Thanks!

 

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Not that strange really. I found with LayWoo-3d that it worked better if I print fast. Some PLAs too. The problem is that you need to keep constant motion through the nozzle. Some materials can break down or fuse at the temperatures involved and therefore form a clot if they are exposed to the heated zone of the hot-end for too long. The best thing is to keep them constantly moving through the nozzle at a brisk pace. I understand this is a major problem with PVA filament as well.

I've not tried Bronzefill yet... I pre-ordered last month, but it has not arrived yet.

Cheers,

Troy.

 

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