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LePaul

First layer question (Ultimaker Original)

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The vertical dotted line is a in model travel move. No retraction is caried out. I don't know if you can influence this in expert mode. Since it is done in the infill area not much harm is done. It is quicker to not retract so that is likely the idea behind it.

I don't know what the problem is with the first layer fotoos. The thing that I see is a flow that did not stabelize in the beginning. Correct me if I am wrong..

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The non-continuous line on the outside of the brim is just an effect from the unfinished priming at the beginning. As soon as the priming leads to a steady material flow the brim looks ok. It will not affect the print quality if the major part of the brim is printed correctly.

However, if you want to get rid of it, increase the amount of the pre-print-extrusion in your start.gcode.

The dotted lines inside the sparse infill are indeed from combing moves. If you loose too much filament with them and get underextrusion following such combing moves, deactivate it in the expert settings or use the RetractWhileCombing plugin. Printing cooler and moving faster (travel speed) reduces the effect.

 

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You may be on to something, I keep getting that first layer under extrusion since I tried printing at a cooler (210) temp.

Thankfully printing with brim fixes most of that, by the end of the first pass things are flowing well Its the first few seconds that seem to lack. Removing the brim after really stinks, I have to remove the build plate from the machine and pry like crazy to get the part removed. I certainly have adhesion! I just wish I could remove the part a whole lot easier!

Maybe I'll up the temp in Cura then after the first passes go OK, lower it manually.

 

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you have an Ultimaker Original, so then it is easy to start a print like this:

preheat pla

when it reaches 200 degrees you can start to turn the feeder wheel on the back by hand and let the pla flow.

then start your print, grab the string that leaves the nozzle.

this way you always start with a full printhead.

 

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you have an Ultimaker Original, so then it is easy to start a print like this:

preheat pla

when it reaches 200 degrees you can start to turn the feeder wheel on the back by hand and let the pla flow.

then start your print, grab the string that leaves the nozzle.

this way you always start with a full printhead.

 

Well true, it does flow, I started the print and the first layer does go on better

 

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If you do not need a brim for adhesion, don't use one ;)

But instead increase the size of the skirt in the expert setting, so that the head is properly primed before starting the object.

Also I changed my start gcode to extrude a bit more (but I always start to prime manually as Peggy explained)

 

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