Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
tinydancer

Underextrusion? Need help with this one...

Recommended Posts

I uploaded a little video of what I'm seeing here. I'm getting what looks like underextrusion issues on the e-Nable Gauntlet. What is strange is I'm hearing this strange noise that sounds like it's coming from the feeder or a motor in the back. You should hear it at around the 4 second,16 second and 33 second marks.

I've never had an issue like this so I'm not sure what the deal is.

Layer Height: 0.1mm

Shell thickness: 2.0 mm

Top/bottom: 2.0mm

Infil: 20%

Speed: 60mm/s

Colorfabb PLA/PHA

205 degrees

Video:

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sound you here is the feeder skipping it's normal it prevents grinding. It happens when the feeder is unable to push the filament as requested.

But it also indicates that you have underextrusion.

It can be either a partially clogged nozzle.

Temperature too low or speed to high.

Among other things.

I also read a lot of people have more trouble printing white PLA for some odd reason, i have experienced the same kind of phenomenon with Ultimaker white, it kept clogging my nozzle and under-extruding at some point.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TinyDancer,

I am printing the enable raptorhand right now in White color fabb as well.

All_parts_at_100___left___single_build_plate

I am not getting great results yet, and am going to change my print settings to something very similar to what you have. I would love to see what your model looks like as a comparison. I am not sure if my quality is a function of the Gcode, the model, or printing issues.

I printed at .2 and a 50mm/s print speed. I too have had underextrusion issues and changed to ColorFabb because I suspect that my last filament had too much variation in the diameter throughout the roll. In some cases it seemed really tight pushing it through just the bowden tube.

Also, I wonder if my tube has distorted or shrunk as it seems tight closest to the print head.

I have also considered changing the extruder to robertI's version. Good luck and let us know if you get it worked out.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'm at a loss what to try next. I've tried multiple Colorfabb colors, have done the atomic method a bunch of times before loading the filament. It starts coming out fine, begins laying down the bottom layer and then just outright stops laying down filament or not enough of it. I'm guessing it's either getting friction in the bowden tube or something with the PTFE coupler.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe check your Teflon indeed...

Follow the steps described here (just stop when the Teflon is taken out):

 

Then take some filaments and try passing through to see if you can spot any friction, you might need to drill it out if it does or clean it a bit with a knife (the outside of the part directed to the head). I had some burned PLA stuck to that part shrinking the outer diameter a bit.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tiny Dancer. Did you try printing at higher temp?

I recently got bad prints when using PLA/PHA to a point where I could no longer print it without underextrusion even at low speed. At 30mm/s and up to 235C I was still getting under extrusion. When using the change filament procedure the feeder was clicking backward because it could not even push the filament properly. When going back to regular PLA I was not having that issue at all. The atomic pull was coming clean almost every time.

I changed the nozzle and I'm now back on track with printing perfect PLA/PHA at 200C with no under extrusion. The color itself is even different (way cleaner) now.

The PLA/PHA seems to be more sticky than when using just PLA. When the nozzle is getting worn out or just too dirty it seems to make PHA stick more to it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@pm_dude - Sorry I missed your post, I decided to just go ahead and order some parts as I've been printing a lot and figured at least the PTFE couple

So I got my replacement parts and started dry fitting the head together to make sure everything was good before I remove the old one. Unfortunately I can only get the hot end isolater to screw down by hand as far as you see it in the picture. Even the old one will only screw down as far as the new one. Is this normal and I just need to continue tightening it down? I'm afraid of stripping the threads and I really need to get this baby back in service.SbqAgCi.jpg

uxTo2Hf.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should be able to get that to fit all the way down.

old nozzle

If you need use the hex drive to help you turn it.

IMG 20141218 203634

 

Mine goes down without any use of force even when cold but I know some have to heat it up to something like 120C to get it to loosen.

 

I hope you wont have issues to loose the set screw on your current nozzle. Make sure you are very delicate on the heater and sensor wires. The heater connections are inside the wire about a inch away from the heater itself.

2014 11 17 23.33.50

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem I'm having right now is removing the wires from the block, they won't budge at all. Tried heating up the nozzle to 120c but that didn't work either. Any suggestions? I know what you mean about them being delicate.

Edit: Tried heating to 220c and various temperatures in between. Not very impressed with the design as you don't really have any way of clamping onto anything without possibly bending it and breaking the wire. And the only alternative is to pull on it, which seems like a good way of pulling the wire right out of the sensor ends. Beyond frustrated at this point.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did take the set screw out, I'm guessing someone must have reefed on it when it was assembled. After a lot of screwing around and heating and cooling I managed to get the heater plug out, but I still can't get the sensor one out. If it just had the metal clamp on the end like the heater then I could at least grab it with pliers like I did the heater, but the wire is flush with the block.

I even tried to get a paper clip in the set screw hole to try and push it from the other side but no go. I guess I'll just keep trying.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may not be possible to get the temp sensor out of the block; sometimes the crimping of the strain relief is loose enough that the metal binds in the hole opening. And there is a very good chance that you'll pull the wires out trying to remove them - in which case the only thing to do is to replace the sensor as well.

Regarding the isolator nut and nozzle; I'd recommend caution when trying to assemble it; you don't want to damage the threads on either part, and the isolator nut especially is quite weak mechanically, as it has thin walls. I suggest that you take a look at the nozzle threads, and see if you see any damage. Sometimes the lead in of the thread at the top of the cylinder can be a bit poorly formed; you may be able to chase the thread cleaner with a small file or, if you have one, an M6 thread die.

When you put it back together, it should look like this:

Nozzle Spacing

 

I'll reply to the ticket you opened, and make sure you get the parts you need ASAP.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may not be possible to get the temp sensor out of the block; sometimes the crimping of the strain relief is loose enough that the metal binds in the hole opening. And there is a very good chance that you'll pull the wires out trying to remove them - in which case the only thing to do is to replace the sensor as well.

Regarding the isolator nut and nozzle; I'd recommend caution when trying to assemble it; you don't want to damage the threads on either part, and the isolator nut especially is quite weak mechanically, as it has thin walls. I suggest that you take a look at the nozzle threads, and see if you see any damage. Sometimes the lead in of the thread at the top of the cylinder can be a bit poorly formed; you may be able to chase the thread cleaner with a small file or, if you have one, an M6 thread die.

When you put it back together, it should look like this:

 

 

I'll reply to the ticket you opened, and make sure you get the parts you need ASAP.

 

I replied to your email Simon, thanks again for handling this so quickly.

Appreciate the reference picture, that definitely helps. I did slightly file the leading thread and then it turned smoothly by hand all the way down.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simon, is their any reason for leaving a gap between the isolator nut and the nozzle?

 

This thread is pretty old, but I feel like I may not be the only one who had that issue, and didn't find this info clearly explained elsewhere (but only parts of it on different threads).

I very strongly believe (still under investigation but the first results are pretty encouraging) that this gap is actually crucial (which is why you should follow the assembly guide when replacing the teflon coupler and first place the teflon ALL THE WAY DOWN into the nut, then screw the nut into the nozzle until you get 1mm spacing between the teflon and the nut).

From what I've seen so far, I think that without this gap, the spring is applying a too high pressure on the teflon, making it deteriorate insanely faster, which then will most likely create printing issue, which may lead you to unmount half the printer replace all the components you can and slowly make you loose your sanity.

Happy printing !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!