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Ultimaker2 is "most desired" printer - 3dhubs survey...

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I hate those 3D hubs articles (even though we score well on them). You cannot compare a sample set with 250 samples with a set that has 15 samples. They make a lot of those kind of mistakes, giving a totally skewed view of what is actually going on.

I know one of the founders is a business guy and these kind of statistics should be his bread & butter. Mistakes like these are (especially if you should know what you are doing) unforgivable.

 

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They appear to be open for suggestion tho, so if you have an idea on how to include the amount of reviews in the algorithm next to the rating itself and (still) maintain a fair outcome between smaller guys and the big boys I for one would be happy to hear. I couldn't really figure it out.

How would you weigh a high amount of reviews different from a smaller amount?

I don't think it is fair when you judge for quality, to say a higher review amount is an advantage.

But it shouldn't be ignored either and it should be taken into consideration when doing the math.

 

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I understand that they want it, but there is no right solution for this. Sometimes you just have to accept this. Sites such as amazon also have this problem, but I don't believe they have a solution for this.

So basicly, they shouldn't write those raports or in the very least don't put any conclusions with it.

 

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Hi lads/lasses,

as a complete newbie I thought this would be a good place to ask for advice. I don't have a printer yet. I read another review in which the Ultimaker 2 was pipped by the Cube Pro Trio. I looked into it and I liked the look of its software and ability to print with nylon. I didn't much like the price though, nor its use of proprietary filaments. I then saw this review and had a look at the Ultimaker 2. It seemed ideal, with its great resolution. Then I came to this forum and found that it will never have 2 filament heads. Also, it seems that one has to do a lot of ongoing maintenance with this printer. It seems to be something of a DIY machine, although there is nothing intrinsically wrong with that! I should point out that I will be using my printer to produce prototypes for products which will eventually be produced in metal, and will involve gears, threads, articulated joints etc.

Would the Cube Pro have the same issues? Everyone here seems to love their printer. Does the inability to use 2 filament types simultaneously not detract too much from its utility?

Any advice gratefully received.

All the best,

Gerald.

 

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The maintenance is very little imho. But the fact that you can do most things yourself is a BIG plus for the ultimaker.

If you do a few regular things like cleaning the nozzle when changing material type (Google atomic pull) your maintenance will be low.

All info you need is on this forum or published by um on github (google ultimaker2+github) look at the assembly manual before you take things appart when needed.

Normally you can print for months without maintenance. Ofcourse depending on what and how much you print.

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I'm obviously biased, so don't take my word for it. I've seen prints from dual extrusion machines and i was not impressed. The lack of quality with most dual extrusion solutions is the main reason why we won't release it for the um2; It's seen as a mostly plug and play machine, so a lot of tinkering would not 'fit'.

 

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I was in the same spot with you. UM2 or the Cube pro duo/trio ?

I'm definetly not dissapointed with my decision and I'm pretty sure that I would be if I bought the Cube. After a lot of search I came to the conclusion that it doesnt worth the money.

The UM2 isn't a perfect machine either but definetly worth its money, untill now anyway. It surpass my expectations and then some. Also the support is like the machine, far from perfect but they are doing a pretty good job.

Be prepared, if you are new to this 3d printing tech, you will need a lot of patient and trial and error. Its not plug and play by any means...

Next week I'm getting my fillaments with a few nylons in. I chose some that can be printed on the UM2. I found that some nylons need higher temps than those UM2 can handle.

First find which nylon you will need and then make your final decision with the printer. Check for the temp that you will need to extrude them and find out if you can print them with UM2! High temps are an issue with the UM2

 

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