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lance-greene

did a 20 hour ninjaflex print

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so i printed this tire for an RC car. the designer of this file hasnt actually printed it, and the only other one of it ive seen printed was in PLA so it didnt really apply as usable. my nozzle jammed about 18 hours into the print (i was sleeping when it happened) but luckily the hub was already finished so it can still be mounted to the car and used (for testing) hoping to get the model designer to update it a bit so it works properly ( a bit to flexible right now). printed at 100% infill, retraction off. 20mm/sec. 240C, i printed it at 0.25 layers, and oiled the filament. with a print in the 20+ hours it definitely needs oil to prevent jamming.11061966_797205463691355_7552277344448796888_n.jpg?oh=5d9d3aa35b3011e380c6f54b46591b74&oe=55A5A53A10636333_797205903691311_3241322901762856687_n.jpg?oh=48bb2b81417356ea85092afde2747b77&oe=55B8798B&__gda__=1437189171_6dae4472212ec709f6b6bd371cda58c2

 

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I feel your pain :D. Nice output!!

NinjaFlex is not really fun to print. I had a lot of prints to do with that latelly and more and more with the 0.25mm nozzle. Having prints with 0.3mm walls is kind of crazy.

I'll have to test SemFlex soon.

 

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WTF... great!!

I had absolutely no luck with Ninjaflex at my UMO up to now...

Maybe you could post your settings a bit more detailed?

Have you oiled the filament or just plain? Which feeder config have you used...

There are tonns of questions I guess... :-)

 

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There's a thread about flexible materials somewhere in the forum ;)

Basically (on a UM2 at least) you need another feeder to prevent the filament from jamming inside.

Print slowly (30mm/s) and stay at a constant speed, avoid retractions (they don't work on bowden setups from my experience). For me no oil is needed (printing Ninja or semi flex)

 

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For me oil is not needed. Slow speed is adviced but it doesn't prevent you from printing thicker layers (anything up to 0.15mm layers work the same). I need to print at 30mm/s or slower in cases where a lot of thin walls are involved.

I keep retractions enabled but they dont really work well (lots of strings). I usually try to unroll the needed filament in advance when possible. The secret for me was to have enough tension in the feeder (roberts feeder with the filament guide) and now it doesn't slip even if I pull on it.

 

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WTF... great!!

I had absolutely no luck with Ninjaflex at my UMO up to now...

Maybe you could post your settings a bit more detailed?

Have you oiled the filament or just plain? Which feeder config have you used...

There are tonns of questions I guess... :smile:

 

I regularly do 2+ hours on a UMO but I slightly modified the feeder (put in a metal bearing in stead of delrin) and put in a little plastic strip above the bearing to make sure there was nowhere to kink the filament in the feeder.

Then I use a 0.6mm nozzle and print slow - I help the filament to begin with when I am purging the nozzle, but after that just let it do its thing - and a watch strap typically prints in 2 hours - will look up my settings when I get to work.

Sometimes I oil, sometimes not (when I do I just put a drip in one of robert's filament cleaners and leave it there!

James

 

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Nice work :)

Semiflex is easier to print (i have tested it) still need to print slow and avoid retractions, but it's a bit less flexible obviously :)

 

Can I get your print settings for semiflex and feeder tension applied? I'm currently trying to solve the issue of the filament wrapping up around the feeder.

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Hi guys, after a while i found your conversation, and i think I've found a solution.

I'm printing on an UM2+, upgraded from UM2. I#m using NinjaFlex and Semiflex. I've had a lot of trouble printing it. Sometimes the tube was not clean enough (old strings of ninjaflex) or simply there was not enough pressure by the extruder. Then it cam out ok, with a bit under-extrusion. My settings are 134 celsius nozzle, 70deg bed. Then i went to Cura and changed the nozzle to 0.6 coming from 0.4. The result blow we away after i changed everything to an multiplier of the nozzle size. Retraction off, fans off, everything at 30mm/s. So this means i'm printing layers at 0.3, shell at 1.2 cause nozzle is 0.6. I don't know maybe i never read the right page in the manual, but this changed drastically the printed result. Also semi flex (TPU95) is much easier than Ninjaflex (TPU85) which in my opinion is simply to elastic for the overall construction.

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