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paul9

Olsson block Matchless V3 3D Solex

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Hello everybody.

Some of you have mounted the Olsson block Matchless V3 3D Solex without changing the 25-watt heater and the temperature sensor?

How is it?

Works well?

I have provided the Heater from 40Watt but do not know whether it makes sense to replace it instead of the original one or not?

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40W and even 50W should be fine. Some low quality 40W heaters have all the heat out near the wires and none at the tip of the heater but the ones made by Ultimaker and 3dsolex should all be fine. Brass melts around 900C! There's no way you can have the back of the block at 900C and the temp sensor as cool as 210C, lol. Long before it hits 900C it will start glowing red hot and you will wonder where that "red light" is coming from.

Now if your temp sensor falls out but the heater is still in the block, and if you have the older firmware that doesn't report "heater error" then, yes, I suppose you could melt the block.

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I am not sure about the 35 watt heater but the 40 watt heated melts some of the block on my friends printer.

 

Can you ask your friend for some photos of how the block looked like after the incident? Maybe there was a leak and it burnt so bad it transformed into a black solid lava block?

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Having a more powerful heater will allow you to print at higher speeds with more consistent temperature.

The faster you push (cold) filament through the block the more juice you will need from the heater to melt all that extra plastic. Another nice side effect is that it heats up a lot faster so there is less waiting time when you start the print.

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Have tried the block with the 1.5 mm nozzle, at a crazy 0.8 layer height.

The first 15 to 30 minutes the printer had a hard time to keep the temperature up, set to 240, but it stuck at 230/235 with only 25%fan.

After a while it got to 240, and I could even increase fan a bit more.

I had to reduce the speed to 26 mm3/s  (yes cubic....) to avoid a death noise from the bondtech.... but this was still way to high in reality as you wont get closing top layers.. These speeds can be nice when printing f.e. a spiralized vase if you like the 0.8 layer "look"

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edit, fyi, checked my heater, it's around 33 Watt

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Edited by Guest
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Here it is. 0.4Nm for pla/pha.

Well mine is 0.8Nm even after using it hundreds of times. I printed it using Ultimaker orange pla.

I have a newer version of the tool that is much flatter. Still tweaking it. It can go to higher torques. I have a 2Nm version and a 6Nm version for the block V3. The 6Nm version breaks with the 1/4 inch drive so it has a longer hex hole instead which delivers 6Nm with no problems. I need to refine this.

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Here it is.  0.4Nm for pla/pha.

Well mine is 0.8Nm even after using it hundreds of times.  I printed it using Ultimaker orange pla.

I have a newer version of the tool that is much flatter.  Still tweaking it.  It can go to higher torques.  I have a 2Nm version and a 6Nm version for the block V3.  The 6Nm version breaks with the 1/4 inch drive so it has a longer hex hole instead which delivers 6Nm with no problems.  I need to refine this.

 

Don't you see any problem by using that much force? When I had to set a nozzle by hand after a small leak sometimes the force can tilt the aluminium part of the head, and even the olsson rotates on itself a bit changing slightly the distance inside the steel coupler/olsson, because it rotates and the top part (tfm/ptfe couple it's still from the pressure. Also, I suppose that to apply that much force the hotend should be on a corner to avoid damage on the x/y shafts?

Edited by Guest

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I'm experimenting. 6Nm is quite a bit of force! I'm now making weaker versions. My current tool lets you pop out one torque and pop in another version.

Anyway Carl is fixing all the blocks such that 0.5Nm should be plenty. Hopefully (fingers crossed).

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There was. All new blocks are fixed now so I'm probably wasting my time. Some of the blocks had a very very tiny ridge that kept the nozzle from screwing the last 0.05mm or so. Carl at 3dsolex has a tool to fix them - it takes about a second per block to fix the ridge.

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There was.  All new blocks are fixed now so I'm probably wasting my time.  Some of the blocks had a very very tiny ridge that kept the nozzle from screwing the last 0.05mm or so.  Carl at 3dsolex has a tool to fix them - it takes about a second per block to fix the ridge.

 

You can send the link for the tool fix by 3DSolex

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