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LePaul

Cura 2.1.2 Support types Which works best?

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I'm getting good prints with this version of Cura after some growing pains.

One thing I would like to understand better in the support types.

The default ZigZag works well holding my part in place, but removing it is turning into a problem.

Since the part I am printing is semi-circular and raised, it generates a lot of support. The model has been optimized for the position it prints at, after a lot of testing with other testers.

Now most of the support material comes off nicely. But a fair amount remains on the part and requires a lot of time with a scraper or sharp knife to remove

13886956_1239237259428514_3748200641772326395_n.thumb.jpg.e70c5aecce82d039f36a10e15f559a6a.jpg

I see there are other types of support structures to chose from...

Capture.thumb.JPG.f64e1bc4726b397c9d7fad3312c3bc1f.JPG

I'm interested to learn what others have used and what their preference has been? Pros? Cons?

13886956_1239237259428514_3748200641772326395_n.thumb.jpg.e70c5aecce82d039f36a10e15f559a6a.jpg

Capture.thumb.JPG.f64e1bc4726b397c9d7fad3312c3bc1f.JPG

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Hi there,

I have been playing a bit lately with the new supports, though not extensively. I have noticed 2 things that might help:

1) Keeping Zig Zag, there is an option to add a roof to the supports. This uses more plastic, but I found it helps quite a bit with removing the supports and keeping a decent surface quality.

2) Without the roof, when removing the Zig Zag supports, I have had some success with pre-cutting any joining bits that are not part of the zig zag pattern (i.e. the first layer grid pattern), and then pulling the support off horizontally, like stretching the zig zags like a spring. This has given me a cleaner surface, though not perfect.

I hope I am explaining that last part clearly enough. :)

Finally, maybe try increasing the Z spacing of the supports to 2 or 3 layers to reduce bonding? That might negatively affect surface quality a bit, but it might also be better than fighting strongly bonded supports. Just thought.

Anyway, hope this helps. :)

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I was curious about the roof option and appreciate you mentioning that.  It's worth a try!

Edit: In a part like this, I just need a Z Distance for the Top Distance. It looks like on this model, using 0.2mm layers, the default is 0.15 top distance. Would that work well? (Yes, keeping ZigZag)

Edited by Guest

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I read, I think in the tool tip, that the Z distance is rounded up to the nearest multiple of layer height. So, with 0.2mm layers, 0.15 distance would get rounded to 0.2 anyway. So, I am not sure it would make a difference. Give it a try though! :) Though, I think I would attempt 0.3mm as a test first.

Also, I just remembered another unrelated but helpful tip I learned a while back. When testing, use just a small section of your model to cut down on time and plastic. Just thought that might help too. :)

Good luck!

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I prefer zigzag as it has the best combination of density and removability in my opinion. Add support roof and it is even better. Current Cura has a bug, using a wider grid for the first layer, which weakens bed adhesion of the support. Maybe they will have that fixed in the next release. For me it always worked up to now.

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Well this is unusual

I took @gr5 's suggestion to lay it a bit flatter and tried the 0.3 z distance and that didn't seem to do much

But my print has a crop circle going on! I think I may leave the supports as they previously were...and print the remaining parts at the default position, as the testers suggested.

Still....I've never seen something like this

IMG_3468.thumb.JPG.8870c93da993978d5ce211d9a2387ffe.JPG

IMG_3468.thumb.JPG.8870c93da993978d5ce211d9a2387ffe.JPG

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I normally use grid. I haven't tried all support options but in the past I have had issues with zigzag breaking off in some places where it was important.

I normally use support roof of 80% and 0.25 nozzle 0.1 layer and the result is very clean and support just pops of easily.

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It's because you followed my suggestion and layed it flatter :(

You can reduce those "crop circles" by lowering your layer height but to reduce it more tilt the part back up the way it was.

You will get these "crop circles" on the top of any sphere you print - the bigger the radius of the sphere the more obvious. So on a friendly octopus not so bad. On this HUGE sphere it's pretty obvious. It's just how layering works. This is why some people want a slicer that makes thinner and thinner slices as you get closer to the top of a sphere. Variable layer height slicing.

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