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fergazz

How to print low resolution (300 microns) with ultimaker filament?

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Hi...

i just print a low resolution (for the first time) gear but I suppose that I setup something wrong or maybe don`t level the bed right. I put the same temp for PLA 195C, speed 40mm/s to 60mm/s.

Finishing is terrible and the layers are not bounding... I forgot to change top and bottom heigh and it was just like 0.6. I never made a so bad looking print, I`m dissapointed :angry:

What I did wrong and how can I fix that for the next low resolution print?

[media=19728][/media]

[media-thumb=19729][/media-thumb]

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For thicker layers (lower resolution) you will want to increase the nozzle temperature by 5-10 C and slow down the print speed. This is to help the material continue to flow properly. This is from 3DVerkstan: "To figure out how fast you're trying to print you simply multiply your nozzle diameter with the layer height and speed. So for example, if you're printing with 0.2mm layers at 60mm/s you would do: 0.4*0.2*60 = 4.8mm 3/s." This shows how much plastic you're trying to extrude per second.

Cura also does this for you if you hover over the 'print speed' field. When trying to force more plastic through the nozzle you want to allow physics to have a chance at it :)

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For thicker layers (lower resolution) you will want to increase the nozzle temperature by 5-10 C and slow down the print speed. This is to help the material continue to flow properly.

 

Thanks a lot I will try that! I had a vague recollection that needed to move on temperature, but was doubtful if needed up or down it. 8)

Edited by Guest
ortographic correction

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This is from 3DVerkstan: "To figure out how fast you're trying to print you simply multiply your nozzle diameter with the layer height and speed. So for example, if you're printing with 0.2mm layers at 60mm/s you would do: 0.4*0.2*60 = 4.8mm 3/s." This shows how much plastic you're trying to extrude per second.

Cool, but which parameters of plastic volume should I play around? I usually print PLA at 0.4*0.1*50= 2.0mm 3/s or 0.4*0,06*30= 0.72mm 3/s... what it means? Sorry if it`s a stupid question :D

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Cura also does this for you if you hover over the 'print speed' field. When trying to force more plastic through the nozzle you want to allow physics to have a chance at it :)

 

Yeah, that`s very usefull... I tryed to increase infill speed to 70mm and Cura advised me to stayed in 60mm/s hehehe.

[media-thumb=19746][/media-thumb]

I really like Cura I just think that the software should improve in auto generating support, as well as edit those when necessary ... and about change temperature at a certain point in the peace, we have to always leave the same temperature, in some situations only change the fan speed doesn`t help. Because of that I`m thinking to move to simplify3d :(

Edited by Guest
photo inclusion

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Despite my disappointment with this printed piece the customer was satisfied. I put myself available to redo but he (who had practically "forced me" to do in 300 microns). But he liked and was pleased to see her and touch her design... he said it was not for mechanical purposes and for him was enough... I felt relieved and offered a discount for next order. :PLast month I made an object for him at 100 microns which came out perfect! That was my lucky...

Edited by Guest

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Just up your temperature some, especially with a part like this which dosn't seem to have any extreme overhangs or details that would suffer severely from it... The result will be a stronger part with much better continuous flow and bonding layers.. I have heavy cooling on my UMO and rarely print PLA below 210 degrees

Edited by Guest
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Just up your tempeprature some, especially with a part like this which dosn't seem to have any extreme overhangs or details that would suffer severely from it... The result will be a stronger part with much better continuous flow and bonding layers.. I have heavy cooling on my UMO and rarely print PLA below 210 degrees

 

Nice, thanks for that, I will definitly increase it! I don`t know if my temp sensor is one of those who has a delay of 10°C cause my prints looks much better with temperatures around 195-198 degrees for 0.1 layer high.

Another doubt, I'm not sure how much the room temperature influences the final print setup, remembering that I live in Rio de Janeiro and usually work with a maximum of 28 degrees environment for print ... when the ambient temperature rises I turn on the air conditioning and put my sunglasses 8)

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I agree with everyone else. More heat.

You asked what to do with the volume calculation. 2mm^3/sec is nice and slow. The printer can do up to about 8mm^3/sec with the .4mm nozzle at 230C (I know - you like to print cooler and indeed quality is better at slower printing speeds and cooler printing but if the customer doesn't care and you want to print fast, and there aren't a lot of overhangs, 230C or even 240C is fine).

But for a larger nozzle like the 0.8 you can easily print double the volume (16mm^3/sec). I recommend never going over half of these limits (4mm^3/sec with .4mm nozzle and 8mm^3/sec for .8mm nozzle) because when you are right at the limit of what the printer can do you will get occasional bad layers (underextruded).

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Nice, thanks for that, I will definitly increase it! I don`t know if my temp sensor is one of those who has a delay of 10°C cause my prints looks much better with temperatures around 195-198 degrees for 0.1 layer high.

 

With 0.1 layer height you are unlikely to need more that 200; quite possibly less than 190, if you feed system is trouble free

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