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Charles320

Better than blue tape!!!

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I print with PLA on an unheated print bed. Per on-line recommendations, I tried using blue painter's tape to get good print adhesion. I didn't get particularly good results. The main problem is that whenever a print edge was near a tape edge, the cooling print would pull the tape up off the print bed. The obvious solutions are careful print placement and using wider blue tape. However, sheets of blue tape seem very expensive and aren't, if you'll pardon the pun, widely available.

I found a really nice alternative at my local hardware store. It's green painter's tape. This tape sticks to the PLA the way that blue tape does, but it has a stronger adhesive. Now, with narrow strips of green tape, I don't see the edge lifting that I used to see with blue tape. The green tape comes off the print bed pretty easily, but I find that I don't need to change it very often. I remove the prints with an upside-down chisel, carefully getting under the edge and levering them off the tape, and am usually good to go for the next print without further ado.

So for 3D printing, I think that green tape is much better than blue tape!

Charles

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I think that for blue tape you actually need to clean it with alcohol the first time. At least that's what I hear when @gr5 talks about it. I don't use blue tape, just bed 60C and fans slow at 2, and most of the time at 100% at layer 6 or so.

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I can't remember having cleaned the blue tape with alcohol back in my UMO days. The prints always adhered nicely to the tape but the tape not to the acryllic bed.

 

You are right I was confused, the trick was to remove the tape or to ensure the tape did stick well enough. Sorrys :D

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I found some 3 inch wide painter's tape...I think it was a knock-off of the 3M brand...at Lowe's a while back.

Prior to my heated bed upgrade, I used the blue tape and had no problem with it adhering to the acrylic bed. (I made sure it was clean and smooth prior to placing tape on it)

I did find it essential to wipe down the tape with rubbing alcohol prior to printing. The prints stuck very, very well. The problem was removing the print always ripped the tape despite my best Ninja moves with the scraper. :)

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glass is better but... everyone talking about blue tape so...

A little heat with blue tape can help the bottom layer get into the cracks. 40C is plenty and you can lower that to 30C once the bottom layer is done. But really if you need a little heat to keep parts from curling off cleaned blue tape then you have other issues.

And about tape not sticking to bed! Yes! The solution is to buy wider tape. I bought some cheap 3 inch (75mm) on ebay. Illuminarti bought 6 inch (150mm) tape! He just uses one piece of tape!

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Just to clarify, I don't have a heated print bed at all.  The bed is just a piece of aluminum (probably) or steel that is painted black.

The initial problem I was having is that whenever a print corner or edge was near a blue tape edge, the print would start curling up from the bed, taking the blue tape with it.  I was able to solve this sometimes by moving the print location relative to the tape edges, so that more tape and adhesive support were available.

I did look into getting wider blue tape, but I couldn't find much except on-line.  The 6" wide blue tape rolls were really expensive, something like $80 for a fairly short length.

The green tape is nice because my PLA sticks to it nicely, it sticks to the print bed nicely even in those print-edge-near-tape-edge conditions, I can get it at my local hardware store, and it has the same few-dollars price as a roll of narrow blue tape.

Removing the print is also easy with the right tool.  I use an old wood chisel that I sharpened.  It's not woodworking sharp, but sharp enough that I can hold it upside down and get under the edge of the print.  Then I lever the print off.  So far it has been clean every time, so the tape lasts for many prints.

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Green tape is the same stuff as far as I know. I suppose one might be better than the other - I don't know. At my local paint store the green frog tape (any width) is expensive. But on ebay the 3 inch blue tape (didn't check green) was cheaper than coffee. But prices change - this was a few years ago. I have plenty of tape for the last few years for my painting needs and don't use it for 3d printing anymore.

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I used to use 3M 3434 Scotch tape. its designed for car body spraying. i found my prints werent sticking, so before each print i would use some medical rubbing alcohol on the blue tape, just a quick wipe over about a minute before the print started. this worked a treat, however i found that the print would stick to the tape, but then teh tape would peel off.

then i discovered 3434. this sticks well. REALLY well. the actual surface of the tape isnta s good as the normal blue tape to stick to, but with the rubbing alcohol method i rarely had any prints lift off after that, and when they did, it was due to my neglect.

have to say, i broke more prints trying to get them off than had currl up!

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