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drindt

Safe to use UM2+ printed materials with food?

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I didn't found a definite answer to this question. So i ask here again, is it safe to process material which is certified for food contact in UM2+? I heard that the nozzle contains lead and for that reason it's not safe to use. Maybe some of the UM staff have an official statement? :)

Thank you very much for taking the time to read, understand an reply,

Daniel

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You will get no official answer except a "no", since the Ultimaker is not certified to be food safe, certification does cost a lot, takes a lot of time and would probably require it to only be used with a certain material etc.

That said, most of the components in the printer do contain nothing that could be even remotely dangerous, yes the brass in the heater block and nozzles do probably contain lead, but it is in the low single-digits (1-4%), so the amount that possibly could get transferred to the plastic would be incredibly low as long as you do not use a extremely abrasive material, and that lead would in turn be mostly encapsulated in the plastic.

Edited by Guest

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It may also depend what you want to do. For single use it could work if you want to make something like a cookie cutter. Regardless of what material you use during 3D printing, the way a model is build (stacked layers) it is an excellent breeding place for germs etc, in between the layers, that would undermine any food-safe label.

Also, usually a material is labeled food-safe before it is being fed through a 3D printer. It doesn't have to be the case, but it can be that if your print-profile is too hot, you burn your material in the hot end and ruin the food safe label.

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The previous advices are good.

If you are just making stuff for your self and not for long term use then I wouldn't worry to much as long as it's cleaned well.

I have worked in the food packaging and processing industry for 14years and I you knew how everything is handled and made then you wouldnt worry much about it.

Ultimaker has to be careful on advice around using prints for food just Incase you do end up getting sick.

And If you are one of those health fanatics then you shouldn't be printing anyway :p

Edited by Guest
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Biggest issue is FDA approved materials, PET I believe is approved for food usage. Don't think that food usage is the same as dishwasher safe.

Check this out.

https://all3dp.com/food-safe-3d-printing-material-filament-plastic/

General information on things to look further into and know before making a food related product.

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The biggest hurdle is going to be the physical properties of the material as it is laid down. Even if you start with a food-safe thermoplastic, there is no way a material manufacturer could get it certified universally in 3D printed form, as every printer prints different with different materials in its filament path, and two identical 3D printers could be printing at different layer heights, temperatures etc... which could and would affect the final surface finish which provides ridges for bacteria to live in.

All that being said, if this is for personal use, I make cups for my children on my 3D printer. I either use ABS and acetone smooth it, or use any other filament and sand it then coat it with a silicone coating. I cannot and will not say if that is food-service safe, but I've killed less than one of my kids so far.

I would definitely not offer such items commercially. I do a lot of product design at my work and that is a can of liability worms I would leave firmly sealed and stored in a cool, dark place.

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