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SigvardsK

TPU 95A filament under extursion?

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Hi,

I am new to 3D printing. Just started couple of months ago and currently have been experimenting with different materials. (ABS,PLA,Nylon,TPU)

With most of the materials I have understood the basics and the prints are quite good (for a beginner, as I have been told), however with TPU I have yet to fully understand its specifics.

Below is a image of TPU print (not finished) and it seems to look like under extrusion.

IMG_20161108_151230.thumb.jpg.74852df649aca952e1a387d1719fdbbd.jpg

The following settings were applied:

L/H - 0.2mm

W/T-1.05mm

T/B-1.2mm

Infill - 50%

Print Speed - 30mm/s

T/B - 15mm/s

Travel Speed - 120mm/s

Material flow - 145%

Fan Speed - 50%

Temp. - 230C

Bed temp. - 70C

Am I correct to assume, that this could be the case of under extrusion? If so, what would be the possible solutions for this matter?

Thank you already in advance!

IMG_20161108_151230.thumb.jpg.74852df649aca952e1a387d1719fdbbd.jpg

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is this the Ultimaker TPU95A filament?

When I take a look at the material profile settings in Cura 2.3, the temp. is set to 260 and the build plate at 110, and fan speed at 0.

Material flow 145%?? could also be the problem, pushing too much material too cold.

Another brand could have different settings, but like neotko stated, under extrusion is mostly solved by higher temp.

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is this the Ultimaker TPU95A filament?

When I take a look at the material profile settings in Cura 2.3, the temp. is set to 260 and the build plate at 110, and fan speed at 0.

Material flow 145%?? could also be the problem, pushing too much material too cold.

Another brand could have different settings, but like neotko stated, under extrusion is mostly solved by higher temp.

Yes. This is the Ultimaker TPU 95A filament.

I see. Ok, I`ll try your recommended settings and let you know how it looks like.

Regarding the 145% material flow, I read here https://ultimaker.com/en/community/18953-ninjaflex-uneven-extrusion that for elastic materials, such as NinjaFlex or TPU, higher material flow is necessary. But then again, I may be wrong.

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I've never printed TPU but go at least to 235C since that is recommended all over the place from Ultimaker.

Fan recommended 35% (you showed 50%).  Also for UM3 fan=50% is exactly the same as fan=100% so if you have a UM3 I would go to 5% fan (which is about the same as 35% on UM2).

https://ultimaker.com/en/resources/22235-how-to-print-with-ultimaker-tpu-95a

Maybe bottom layers came out better because fan speed was lower (nozzle was warmer).

Edited by Guest

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I run TPE's, TPU's and Soft PLA all with these printer settings in the MATERIAL.TXT file:

[material]

name=TPE

temperature=245

temperature_0.40=245

temperature_0.25=245

temperature_0.60=245

temperature_0.80=245

temperature_1.00=245

bed_temperature=60

fan_speed=50

flow=100

diameter=2.85

I've used .1 thru .4 layer height

In Cura, set the print speed to 20-25 max. Use 100% infill unless its a real thick part. If its a very thick part, set your Wall Thickness and Top and Bottom Thickness to 1.2.

Keep your material dry! Once it absorbs moisture, you get bubbling. Its not always an issue but it can make holes on thin wall parts. I've use the NijaFlex material a lot and I can never seem to print that material without some bubbling so you'll have to accept a lousy looking surface.

Create a shirt that touches the outside of your part. Otherwise you'll get lift if the part is large. Support can be a real part quality killer. I manually create my support in the model because its a pain removing it from areas of the model that really don't need it.

Good Luck!

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I wouldn't go higher in temperature, 225-235C should work fine. But after an atomic pull, I would try with 110% flow instead of 145%. This will reduce the pressure on the material a bit.

Is your feeder set to the 'middle' setting?

 

Yes, the feeder is set at the middle setting.  Ok, I`ll try your suggestion. Thank you!

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I run TPE's, TPU's and Soft PLA all with these printer settings in the MATERIAL.TXT file:

[material]

name=TPE

temperature=245

temperature_0.40=245

temperature_0.25=245

temperature_0.60=245

temperature_0.80=245

temperature_1.00=245

bed_temperature=60

fan_speed=50

flow=100

diameter=2.85

I've used .1 thru .4 layer height

In Cura, set the print speed to 20-25 max. Use 100% infill unless its a real thick part. If its a very thick part, set your Wall Thickness and Top and Bottom Thickness to 1.2.

Keep your material dry! Once it absorbs moisture, you get bubbling. Its not always an issue but it can make holes on thin wall parts. I've use the NijaFlex material a lot and I can never seem to print that material without some bubbling so you'll have to accept a  lousy looking surface.

Create a shirt that touches the outside of your part. Otherwise you'll get lift if the part is large. Support can be a real part quality killer. I manually create my support in the model because its a pain removing it from areas of the model that really don't need it.

Good Luck!

 

Ok, thank you for your suggestions. I`ll try your recommendations and see what happens.

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