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LesHall

Reducing Print Times

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Hi all, could someone point me to any advice on reducing print times on a UM2+? I'd like to run the print head faster using PLA for now, or I can switch to another filament if it helps. Please advise and thanks in advance.

Les

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Bigger nozzles. There are trade-offs, but for me I am really liking the speed of printing with .8mm nozzles. A .6mm nozzles might be a better trade off for you, but you will find a marked increase in model speed even with that.

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Bigger nozzles.  ...

 

Ah yes, thanks for the reminder. I'm a big fan of the 0.8mm nozzle and have one in hardened stainless steel. I'm also interested in pushing the envelope of print speed a little bit - nothing outrageous mind you, just some PID values and how to enter them, some such like that. Ideas and experiences are welcome!

Les

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Besides bigger nozzles, it also really depends on your model and what you want to use it for. If the shape allows it, you could print it single walled, which makes it much faster. No infill also cuts down your printing time, but this does not work for all models.

In general small prints can not achieve similar top speeds as bigger models.

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Besides bigger nozzles, it also really depends on your model and what you want to use it for. If the shape allows it, you could print it single walled, which makes it much faster. No infill also cuts down your printing time, but this does not work for all models.

In general small prints can not achieve similar top speeds as bigger models.

 

TY Sander, this I recall except the last point which I guess makes sense. I am glad you wrote it though because my memory is fading and I seem to need constant reminders. I was also hoping to learn about PID settings - where to set them and what values are good?

As much as I love 3D printing, I feel that I will have to give up my machine for safety reasons. I've recently noticed that I take too many chances with improper techniques. Then again, maybe I can learn by staying current with some basic skills...

I guess I love it too much to leave it.

Les

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PID settings should not primarily affect speed? It would stabilize the temperature and thus increase the quality of the print as far as I understand.

3dsolex matchless nozzles have better heat transfer, so can be used to print faster. And they come up to 2mm nozzles. So if you are able to get a extruder fast enough and efficient heater, I think I have read that it is possible to push around 100 mm³/s of plastic, which is an insane amount! For 750g of PLA you will empty the reel in around 1,5-2,0 hours!

Edited by Guest

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Hi Les, what improper techniques are you referring to, and how is this affecting your health? It would be a shame if you would have to get rid of your Ultimaker. I know of a lot of projects you are working on. Not at the cost of your health of course, but I have no doubt that there are ways you can continue to use it safely.

What would you like to improve by changing the PID settings?

Is the matchless nozzles the one with the cylinders on the inside? I don't believe it has better heat transfer, but due to the internal geometry there is also some heating going on from in the chamber, not just the outside. I think there were also some sidenotes, but don't recall them at the moment..

100mm3/s? That does sound insane! Did you manage this?

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AreDigg, by PID settings I meant the motion control PID settings. Slic3r for example has these controls.

Sander: The worst thing of all is I think I have messed up the threads in my Olsen Block from over tightening and tightening / removing nozzles while hot. I believe the point of the Olsen Block is to act as a heat sink to deform the threads somehow such that the nozzles can be swapped when cool???

Also I have a tendency to stick my hands and even my head into the workspace while hot! I don't know what to do with old spools or old desiccant packets.

I have recently discovered that my retractions are incorrect because the bonded tube at the entrance of the motor housing on the back where the filament is keeps moving and down with every retraction.

So yeah, a lot of little things and others I can't think of right now.

Les

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AreDigg, by PID settings I meant the motion control PID settings.  Slic3r for example has these controls.  

Sander:  The worst thing of all is I think I have messed up the threads in my Olsen Block from over tightening and tightening / removing nozzles while hot.  I believe the point of the Olsen Block is to act as a heat sink to deform the threads somehow such that the nozzles can be swapped when cool???

Also I have a tendency to stick my hands and even my head into the workspace while hot!   I don't know what to do with old spools or old desiccant packets.  

I have recently discovered that my retractions are incorrect because the bonded tube at the entrance of the motor housing on the back where the filament is keeps moving and down with every retraction.

So yeah, a lot of little things and others I can't think of right now.  

Les

Hi Les, thank you for your reply!

The point of the Olsson Block is that you can swap nozzles. That is the main usp.

You should not swap nozzles cold, you will most likely break the thread. So you are doing a good job swapping them hot. Over-tighting on the other hand is not so good. Personally I never use any tools to tighten the nozzles, well, except this 'cap'. When the hot end is warm, I can put in the nozzle in there manually and usually it is in there before the heat has made the nozzle too hot too touch. Finally, I use that cap to turn it tight. That has always done the trick for me. But there are also tools that measure or control the amount of torque you can apply. @IrobertI, do you remember how much torque was suppose to be applied?

I am curious, what does sticking your head in the build volume has to do with empty/old reels? ;)

Luckily, it doesn't sound like it may influence your personal health (except, don't burn your head on the glass plate ;)) Maybe some health things to fix for your Ultimaker. But that is what we are here for :)

About the bowden tube, is there still a horse shoe securing the bowden collet? That should prevent your bowden tube from moving up and down. If your bowden tube moves up and down, this kinda eliminates any retractions. So you would have to start retracting more, but that would be the wrong approach trying to solve this. You would be far better off to just secure your bowden tube and use normal settings.

Good luck! :)

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Sander,

TY for info. Mention of looking too close into printer due to nearsightedness and too many spools galore on the lower shelves of the print cart are unrelated. Fortunately my hair is short, lol.

I looked closely at retraction issue - apparently over time (printer is a year old I think) the Bowden tube has worn and is too small a diameter by maybe 1mm or 2mm. So it is now loose. blue plastic horshoe is in place just fine. Will run prints with setting of no retraction for no to temporarily remedy the issue.

So I am swapping nozzles properly - good!

Les

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100mm3/s? That does sound insane! Did you manage this?

No, I haven't tried it. I just read about it. But now maybe I should! :) With 2 mm nozzle and 1 mm layer height, the movement speed should not need to be more than 50mm/s. Halve the layer and double the speed would still be possible, the question is if the nozzle really is able to melt the plastic fast enough, and the extruder are able to keep up!

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Les

you should try the tool from Anders Olson that's the Toque meter, then I suppose not possible to over tighten, it might of fell out of use I have the STL Files if you cant find them.

OK Bob, I'll try a torque meter from Anders Olson. I think now after some more use that the Olson block is not in fact stripped but actually there is some filament residue in the threads. This is because I saw and removed filament residue (color: black, texture: brittle) from the nozzle threads and also by the way it tightens, more continuously that only at the end.

Les

p.s. the print bed heats just fine now. It was a setting or something, I forget what.

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