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ATeachingBro

The best cheep glue?

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Hey all, I am a Highschool teacher who has been making prints for my students with an Ultimaker 3 extended. However, I end up going through at least 1-2 tubes of super glue a week, and my budget cant support that, does anyone have any cheap alternatives for super glue?

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So this is to glue two parts together? Why are you gluing parts together so much? I only glue together maybe one in a thousand parts.

Are these PLA because the answer depends on which plastics you are using.

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I think super glue (cyanoacrylate) is already one of the cheapest glues, since you need only very little to get the job done. The thinner the layer, the stronger the bonding.

I don't know any glue that bonds better on PLA. Cyanoacrylate seems to melt the upper layer of the PLA a little bit: if I break apart a bonding, it often fails in the PLA, not in the glue.

Maybe you could instruct your students to design special "bonding areas" into their models, so that you can get a maximum bonding strength with minimum amount of glue? How to do that, will depend on their models, for example a few flat mating plates? Or some sort of dovetail system, like in old wood works?

Here in Europe, cyanoacrylate tubes usually are little tubes of 3 grams or 3ml. But they do exist in "industrial" packaging too, for use in industrial production lines. This is a lot cheaper per volume. Maybe that could be part of a solution?

For bonding ABS you could use acetone of course, on the condition that you have good vapour extraction. Put the parts together, and let some acetone drip into the seams. Keep parts together for quite a while, until the acetone dries out.

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Obviously, hardware stores can't beat that ebay price.

Last week when walking through a Brico shop, I took a quick look at the prices. An "industrial" bottle of 20ml cyanoacrylate costs 13 euro (Belgium, Europe). Compared to 6 euro for 2 little tubes of 3ml of the same product, next to it. I think the brand was "Bison".

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Obviously, hardware stores can't beat that ebay price.

Last week when walking through a Brico shop, I took a quick look at the prices. An "industrial" bottle of 20ml cyanoacrylate costs 13 euro (Belgium, Europe). Compared to 6 euro for 2 little tubes of 3ml of the same product, next to it. I think the brand was "Bison".

Depends on whether shipping is enclosed or not. I have thought I had a deal or two on Ebay and then saw the shipping, which doubled or more the price of the object.

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