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Ghene

Printing on Fabric

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I think you need a fairly non-stretchy fabric. I think tulle or denim have been used. And then you'd probably want to use some binder clips to secure it to . the glass plate. Beyond that...I bought some fabric to try it out a couple weeks ago and haven't had time yet.

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1 minute ago, fbrc8-erin said:

I think you need a fairly non-stretchy fabric. I think tulle or denim have been used. And then you'd probably want to use some binder clips to secure it to . the glass plate. Beyond that...I bought some fabric to try it out a couple weeks ago and haven't had time yet.

 

Thank you! I was hoping to try printing on thicker fabrics. what sort of settings do I need? 

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Like what kind of fabrics? To wear? 

You want to make sure that first layer is really in there, merge with the fabric. That is the most important. Because the fabric can move along with the plastic / print head you want a thick first layer and on the slow side of things. 

 

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1 hour ago, SandervG said:

Like what kind of fabrics? To wear? 

You want to make sure that first layer is really in there, merge with the fabric. That is the most important. Because the fabric can move along with the plastic / print head you want a thick first layer and on the slow side of things. 

 

I want to try working with thicker fabrics like cotton canvas, linen, suede and some upholstery fabrics. So, slow speed and anchor the fabric properly? Ok.Will try that... after the varse is finished printing. 😁

Thank you.

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The molten filament has to be able to flow into the pores of the fabric, and to saturate it for best bonding. So the fabric should not chemically reject the filament, and it should not contain soaps and other stuff that rejects filament and destroys bonding. I think you definitely need a non-stretch material. If you would use stretch, then (1) or it is going to wrinkle afterwards if you print on it while stretched, (2) or it is going to move all places if you print on it while not stretched.

 

Recently we had scientific posters (120cm x 90cm) printed on canvas, instead of on paper. This canvas is quite thick and very stable. It does not sag when you hang up the poster on the display panels. But I don't know what material it is. Maybe you could search in that direction? Or try oil painting canvas? If you would have an artist's painting shop in your environment, it might be a good idea to go there for advice and to feel the materials?

 

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5 minutes ago, geert_2 said:

Recently we had scientific posters (120cm x 90cm) printed on canvas, instead of on paper. This canvas is quite thick and very stable. It does not sag when you hang up the poster on the display panels. But I don't know what material it is. Maybe you could search in that direction? Or try oil painting canvas? If you would have an artist's painting shop in your environment, it might be a good idea to go there for advice and to feel the materials?

 

 

Those are linen and cotton canvas. I have some of those. Actually, I think when I have more time, I will experiment with all the fabrics I have (from hemp to fine silks to natural and synthetic fibres). 

 

9 minutes ago, geert_2 said:

The molten filament has to be able to flow into the pores of the fabric, and to saturate it for best bonding. So the fabric should not chemically reject the filament, and it should not contain soaps and other stuff that rejects filament and destroys bonding. I think you definitely need a non-stretch material. If you would use stretch, then (1) or it is going to wrinkle afterwards if you print on it while stretched, (2) or it is going to move all places if you print on it while not stretched.

 

As some of the fabrics are thick, do you think I should calibrate the build plate with the fabric on or is that a stupid idea? 😬

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13 minutes ago, Ghene said:

As some of the fabrics are thick, do you think I should calibrate the build plate with the fabric on or is that a stupid idea? 😬

I would say, depends on how thick. If it is so thick the nozzle drags through the fabric, it is too close. 

You want it to be just above the fabric, with very little space in between so the extruded filament has only 1 way to go; which is in the fabric, not out to the sides. 

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1 minute ago, Ghene said:

As some of the fabrics are thick, do you think I should calibrate the build plate with the fabric on or is that a stupid idea? 😬

Yes, that seems a good idea. The fabric of our posters is ca. 0.5mm thick I guess (I don't have it here at the moment), so it sure won't fit under a 0.1mm calibrated nozzle distance. Some painting canvas might be even thicker. I think you will need to establish the best plate calibration by trial and error. Maybe the nozzle should just very lightly touch the fabric, or be maximum up to 0.1mm above it, depending on the roughness, thickness and compressibility of the fabric? Anyway keep watching carefully. If you have success, let us know what worked best.

 

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