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JohnInOttawa

Suggestions for XTRAND Strength test models

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Well, true to their word, the Owens-Corning folks sent me two 50g samples of XSTRAND GF30, and PA6. And fast!

 

Thank you! 

 

Now, I believe I was asked on this forum to post results.  I intend to do more than that if I can.  As this is an open community I'd like to leverage your smarts to help me compare this material properly.

 

Here is what I have on hand to compare

- PLA (I think that will be not be a contender but will be used  for a mockups and test prints)

-Ultimaker Nylon

-Taulman T-glase

-Nylforce CF

 

Keeping in mind that I only have 50g of the XSTRAND to work with, I'd like to get this right on the first try if I can.  Owens-Corning has a UM3 so I'll apply their print setup recommendations for the XSTRAND. My own UM3 will be modified with BondTech DDG feeders and 3dSolex Hardcore with everlast nozzles.  So a bit different than the S5 with CC Red, but I hope close enough.

 

Sadly, I don't have access to anyone printing Onyx on a Markforged at present, but if I'm able to make that connection, I will try and see about getting the same shape printed and used for the trial.

 

Timing - this will take a few weeks, just due to other demands.  All that to say, there's no rush.

 

I'd also welcome thoughts on testing strategies.  I can apply a force gauge, but the range is the thing.  How much force am I expecting this part to withstand?   

 

So, thanks in advance for your help!

John

Edited by JohnInOttawa

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I hope I'm not practising bleeding here, but I got the hardcores to print the nylforce with is also nylon/cf,so they should hold up.  If I wear out something, it should just be the nozzle, which in my case is replaceable.

 

Yeah, I hear you on cost.  That was the main reason for my request for a sample.  If it makes the difference and I can justify flowing the cost to a client, then it's great to see the advance.  I'll look forward to seeing how you make out with the Zytel.  It sounds like getting the printer to play nice has been a challenge.

J

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@JohnInOttawa: You could consider requesting MarkForged sample parts here: https://3d.markforged.com/request-sample-part.html - this is "just" their usual keychain sample in Nylon and Nylon+continuous Carbon Fiber, but it helps to get a feel for the material, and you can print something similar on other printers with other materials.

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Just that you know, those won't be Onyx Parts, but pure Nylon and Nylon+CF.

 

For getting Onyx Parts, I would suggest either contacting MarkForged directly, or getting parts printed through 3DHubs or similar.

 

While we do have a MarkForged printer, we use it almost exclusively for in-company stuff, and anyway shipping costs to Canada would be more than the part's worth probably, so I fear I can't help you out here unfortunately.

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@P3D, I appreciate your help!  While you're a long way away, your perspective as an active user of markforged onyx is valuable.

 

I did ask Markforged if they could provide a pure Onyx part, no go unfortunately.  I am told that they will send a nylon and an onyx/CF reinforced part, so we shall see what shows up.

 

I'd like to know more about your experience with the Markforged, but as that would be somewhat OT, may I PM with some questions?

 

Cheers

John

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I'm happy to take input on an appropriate test model and will share the STL for that model once it's finalized.  Now, I am not a test lab, so apart from maybe bringing in a force gauge (I'm thinking a 500# limit should do it), I don't want to create the impression that this is going to be high science or engineering. 

 

But now you've given me an idea, there is a proper materials lab at the nearest university and I may still have a friend or two there. If I can set that up then I'll happily accept parts printed in your preferred material. 

 

Hmmm.  What are the odds I can find an engineering student interested in testing a whole bunch of things to destruction?  Nah, they'd hate that...;-)

 

J

Edited by JohnInOttawa

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You might want to have a look at THIS thread and THIS  one. @gr5 has done a lot of work testing different materials and has built a machine for testing them. But you may gain some ideas on how to do your tests.

 

Keep in mind that changing print temps and layer heights can affect your results. 

 

This is a bit off topic but You might also want to look at other aspects of the prints other than just strength. Most of the time these reinforced materials are used for there mechanical properties. This normally means some sort of tolerance is also involved. So measuring see the dimensional accuracy is also another interesting comparison that could help someone decide what's the best material to use for there application. I also find that some of these filled filaments can have quite bad stringing. If your printing a mechanical part with holes for fixtures then this can be an issue also.

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Thank you @Labern!  I have reached out to George to see if I can extend from his work in any way.  I won't presume to have his level of test capacity or knowledge, but if I can at least make what I do relatable in some way to his work, perhaps it will add to the body of knowledge.

 

I also agree that there are many facets to what makes a material right for a job.  I have heard from another member here that some of the characteristics that make for an excellent matte surface finish may resulting in something too rough for regular skin contact.  I don't know yet how I will evaluate that.  I am thinking about setting up a block of soft pine and seeing how much sawdust I can raise with the surface of each printed part.    High texture might be very desirable for rough service parts where maintaining grip in wet or greasy conditions is key, whereas braces or other body contact parts might need something different.

 

WRT to dimensions and stringing, here's where I am throwing myself on the mercy (or knowledge base if you will) of the group and your post is an excellent example of what I was hoping would happen.  While I can't guarantee I'll have the capability to do the kind of testing everyone requires, the chances of me getting close are better with this kind of input.

 

Much appreciated!

John

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