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LePaul

Printing with other than Ultimaker PLA

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I've almost used up my entire spool of Ultimaker silver PLA on my Ultimaker (Original) printer. As I have learned more about my printer and the art of selecting the right speeds and temperatures, I thought I would inquire about different materials and brands.

I know PLA isn't super strong and for most of the things I am working with, that hasn't been a big issue. But now I am getting into some projects were more strength is better. Since I do not have a heated platform and ABS isn't an option until Ultimaker offers such upgrades, I was curious about the other materials I have seen on PrintedSolid.com and elsewhere.

The woodfill looks amazing for certain parts where the wood texture would be ideal

What about the Taulman nylons?

The colorFab XT?

I'd like to hear what's worked for other Ultimaker owners and any tips they wish to share!

Thanks!

Paul

 

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I find Taulman quite hard to print on my UM original - the diameter can be a bit too big at times, and it's very slippery - hard for the extruder to grip. I got better results with PA6 nylon, which was a little easier to print, and I got it to stick to the unheated print bed using gluestick and plenty of brim.

 

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PET filaments are a good choice - Madesolid PET+ and Colorfabb XT. Much stronger than PLA, but warp slightly more when printing and are more expensive. I'd only use them for smaller parts which need the strength. More or less indistinguishable from PLA in terms of print quality otherwise.

In PLA's, printbl is excellent. The banana yellow has a print quality that is unparalleled in PLA. I'm not crazy about the color, but for producing ultra-high quality prototypes it is exceptional.

Woodfill produces the nicest finished part quality I've ever seen, but until someone posts a thorough no-clogging 0.4mm nozzle print guide for it, I'm keeping it on the shelf since I don't have the time to deal with clogs.

 

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printbl is very good quality in usa - just as good as UM filament. But the reels it comes in don't fit on the UM. So you will have to work something out - make your own spool holder or put it on the floor or ... something.

I've printed PA6 nylon and it can withstand boiling temperatures no problem but I don't think it's as strong as PLA. Taulman nylon is incredibly strong I hear - haven't tried it. You probably have to print it extremely slow (like 10mm/sec) so it can get through the bowden. I don't know.

 

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i did some tests with taulman 645 on my UM 1 and was very impressed with the quality i got.

printed with normal speed (40mm) on a heated bed.

the biggest problem is that its hygroscopic and so after a few hours in normal air its nearly unprintable.

but for small parts it is awesome and can be dyed using cooking water and food coloring :)

http://richrap.blogspot.co.at/2013/04/3d-printing-with-nylon-618-filament-in.html

 

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