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mcgyvr

Manual bed heating (for vapor polishing)

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MAINTENANCE ADVANCED BED-TEMP

I'm sorry you haven't found this yet. This is how I always turn on my machine - I hit power, heat bed to 50C, nozzle to 150C, then pull out the SD card and go off to my computer to copy the gcode file to the SD card. Come back later and it's warmed up.

 

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I personlly wouldn't heat up Acetone directly on the machine . Personal preference and all that. I'd like to to do it away from the machine..

I have also seen a dedicated Vapour Machine

http://www.sky-tech.com.tw/sky-tech/en/box4.html

they also do 3d Printers with dual heads Looked at them in 3d London show 2014, looked fine but suspect shortcuts.

 

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MAINTENANCE ADVANCED BED-TEMP

I'm sorry you haven't found this yet. This is how I always turn on my machine - I hit power, heat bed to 50C, nozzle to 150C, then pull out the SD card and go off to my computer to copy the gcode file to the SD card. Come back later and it's warmed up.

 

Same here :)

 

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I've tried methods on the heated bed by placing a print in a large glass jar that just fit in the UM2. I'd heat the bed, which in turn, would heat the acetone and vapor polish the part.

Problem is, the vapor reacts a lot faster on the lower part of the print than it does on the upper part. I theorize this is becasue acetone is heavier than air, and sits lower in the chamber (at concentrated levels).

A much better approach I've settle on is cold polishing. Simply place the part in a glass jar, or acetone resistant container. Drape paper towels over the insides of the jar and saturate the towels with acetone. Place the part(s) in the jar/container, and cover with a lid. Check back in 2 to 4 hours. I find that the acetone saturated paper towels that run the full length of the tub vertically gives a more even result.

Furthermore, I've had even more success by cold vapor polishing for 2 or 3 hours... just until the surface begins to shine. I then remove the part and allow to dry and harden for several hours. Then it's back to the chamber for 2 or 3 hours.. Usually 2 to 3 applications work charms. I've gotten super glossy parts this way without over-softening the ABS, destroying too much detail, etc...

Hope this helps.

 

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I still believe using a UM2 is a very expensive recipient for doing this type of thing... Good to know the process though

 

yeah I could just use a hotplate but figured thats all the UM2 is down there anyways :)

I get my UM2 tomorrow and if I do try it I'll obviously watch for any signs of damage if/when I do try it. And if something happens.. well then I'll just print a new part :)

Just saw a few videos of people using their heated beds on other machines and just thought "oh thats perfect.. why not"

 

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I bought a few 1qt mason jars with lids and heat up the acetone on my UM2 build plate with no issues.

 

  • Make a hook out of a paper clip & tape onto the bottom/inside of one of the mason jar lids. Make the hook long enough so the bottom of your dangled part is just above the top of the acetone, not touching.
  • Heat up bed to 90c
  • Place mason jar with few teaspoons of acetone already inside onto the build plate and cover with a second lid (no hook on this one) to keep the vapors in
  • Watch as the vapors start climbing up the sides of the jar
  • Put your part onto the hook hanging from the prepared lid
  • When the vapors are high enough so that your dangled part would be 'submerged', swap the lids, gently lowering your part into the jar
  • How long to leave in is personal preference
  • When finished, pull out your part and simply lower it into another mason jar without acetone and let dry. I also had a few long, thin wooden sticks clamped upright with clothespins that I would dangle finished parts on to dry.

I had 12 identical prints and left them in from 30seconds up to 5min in 30sec increments and didn't really notice a difference at all between 30sec and 5min. The parts didn't have too much intricate detail, so maybe longer would cause you to loose some of that? I now leave mine in betwen 45sec-1min and pull them back out. Just enough to wet the surface.

For these small prints, tackiness dry time seemed to only take a few minutes. I could touch the sides and it felt dry and smooth as silk, leaving no fingerprints. The ABS still needs time to re-solidify, a few hours, but you can gently pick it up after a few min.

You could probably find larger jars with lids for doing larger prints, but the inside of the UM2 is only so big.

Edit: If I remember, I'll take some pics when I get home tonight.

 

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