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SandervG

What do you use it for?

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While standing at the coffee machine in the office I was talking to some colleagues and we had different opinions on what our users used 3D printing for most.

We weren't talking about Fashion, Education or any other field, but is it used for rapid prototyping, a final product (for own use or sale? / short runs)? Molding/casting? Creating a tool for another step in the process? Personal projects?

.. anything else?

I personally use it most for printing figurines for my personal use, because I always enjoyed drawing character design most in my days as an illustrator. What about you?

oh.. yes. A poll feature would be nice in the forum. I wrote it down ;)

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We print different kind of object with our UM2 at our office Sevenedge.

We use the prints as decoration on the desks of our staff. So no real use tbh... :D

There is even a waiting queue for printing objects right now, as for that we'll probably buy an Ultimaker 2 extended soon. Or there would be rumors of an UM3? :-)

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Yep mostly personal project, we did print a few 3D logo's of our best customers and gave it to them. They were extremely happy with their present. :)

Sevenedge is an office full of gadgets : a collection of drones, VR devices, parrot robots, ... and our UM2!

We use most of our gadgets pure for fun. My team loves our UM2, the first thing they do when they arrive at the office in the morning is checking out the print that was finished.

And during the weekends we try to print high quality objects because the office is empty for 60 hours when we close the door at friday evening. :)

As for that, it sux we can't get the Octoprint installation at Sevenedge working properly... But I'll keep watching my thread for somebody to help me out.

I can't wait to experiment with the special filaments from Colorfabb, but step by step because I'm still learning to get good quality prints with the simple PLA. :)

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I use it to make things I want now or can't buy - at the simplest I make bicycle clips (hard to get inf flaming pink) watch straps (ninjaflex) wedges to go in a rowing boat/rowing machine to raise my heels by 10mm and stop muscle cramps, handles to hold up a chin-up bar, scale models to show builders how I want a staircase built, scale models of houses for clients - oh, and hands for children via e-nable.

My go-to machine for getting things out of my head and into my hands!

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Well you know some of the things I make :p

But I also make a lot of thing for around the house. Not like vases but holders and 1off things that you cant buy.

Mostly its for personal projects some projects for others.

I just wish you would hurry up and release a Metal 3d printer :p

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I also make a lot of one-off parts that can't be bought, mostly mechanical - spacers, hangers, brackets, clips. I don't open a toolbox or dig through scraps looking for solutions any more, but rather 3D model and print what I want (and occasionally need).

I do the same for friends and customers whose eyes light up when they see a 3D printer in action - they are the ones who "get it" :)

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I have bought my UM2 for building camera motion control systems for timelapse photography. Without a 3D-printer those products would not be possible to manufacture.

An other benefit from 3D-printing is the low weight of plastic, which is a huge factor for products which are used outdoors. A conventional design would be much heavier and from the design not so appealing.

Since I produce those products in small series, the prints are manufactured for the use in the endproduct and the printer gives me the flexibility to test different designs and prototypes in a very cheap and fast way.

Further information and pictures on my website:

http://puremoco.com/

11154750_446308878882483_3765012070759598128_o.thumb.jpg.bd28eabab0d45ad94d06832368430ba6.jpgIMG_8321.thumb.jpg.7bc21c04e526fdc3c40bd7c888eb2be6.jpgIMG_8314.thumb.jpg.a34d8e7c292a7b1f5e1b9cc494a05768.jpgIMG_8316.thumb.jpg.3756aad8459b9cdcbca98e2c1c2ca43f.jpg

11154750_446308878882483_3765012070759598128_o.thumb.jpg.bd28eabab0d45ad94d06832368430ba6.jpg

IMG_8321.thumb.jpg.7bc21c04e526fdc3c40bd7c888eb2be6.jpg

IMG_8314.thumb.jpg.a34d8e7c292a7b1f5e1b9cc494a05768.jpg

IMG_8316.thumb.jpg.3756aad8459b9cdcbca98e2c1c2ca43f.jpg

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Yep mostly personal project, we did print a few 3D logo's of our best customers and gave it to them. They were extremely happy with their present. :)

Sevenedge is an office full of gadgets : a collection of drones, VR devices, parrot robots, ... and our UM2!

We use most of our gadgets pure for fun. My team loves our UM2, the first thing they do when they arrive at the office in the morning is checking out the print that was finished.

And during the weekends we try to print high quality objects because the office is empty for 60 hours when we close the door at friday evening. :)

As for that, it sux we can't get the Octoprint installation at Sevenedge working properly...  But I'll keep watching my thread for somebody to help me out.

I can't wait to experiment with the special filaments from Colorfabb, but step by step because I'm still learning to get good quality prints with the simple PLA. :)

 

Depending on what materials you are going to print with, you could look into installing an Olsson Block. Some materials can be abrasive, and with an Olsson block it is easier to replace your nozzle. I am sure you'll get the Octoprint working soon. And thank you for replying!

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I'm merely testing things out at the moment as a rookie with more abstract studies that you can find here.

I hope in time to have some more insight into this field and it's possibilities and maybe some more functional design in the end.

 

Thank you for your reply. What was your goal when you decided to buy an Ultimaker? Did you already have a thought on what direction you will be heading after your abstract studies? Functional things for in the house, or? Saw the thread by the way, looking good! Curious to see where this is headed!

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I use it to make things I want now or can't buy - at the simplest I make bicycle clips (hard to get inf flaming pink) watch straps (ninjaflex) wedges to go in a rowing boat/rowing machine to raise my heels by 10mm and stop muscle cramps, handles to hold up a chin-up bar, scale models to show builders how I want a staircase built, scale models of houses for clients - oh, and hands for children via e-nable.

My go-to machine for getting things out of my head and into my hands!

 

Awesome! You are like a contractor or a decorator?

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I have bought my UM2 for building camera motion control systems for timelapse photography. Without a 3D-printer those products would not be possible to manufacture.

An other benefit from 3D-printing is the low weight of plastic, which is a huge factor for products which are used outdoors. A conventional design would be much heavier and from the design not so appealing.

Since I produce those products in small series, the prints are manufactured for the use in the endproduct and the printer gives me the flexibility to test different designs and prototypes in a very cheap and fast way.

Further information and pictures on my website:

http://puremoco.com/

 

Thanks for your reply. I would think low weight could also be a disadvantage.. doesn't weight equal imbalance or instability? How do you use/design it, that this is not the case?

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At first i bought an Ultimaker 2 because i wanted to do something creative, i'm a software developer and i wanted something that combines IT and creativity, that's when i got interested in 3d printing.

After some research i found that my best bet was to go for an Ultimaker 2, and i was right!

I print a lot of unuseful stuff mainly for fun, figurines, vases, busts etc... I also have a project for Veterinary use that you can find here: https://www.facebook.com/3D2Vet

For the moment we are testing external fixators for complicated bone surgeries, this is an example:

11221851_1642188782727758_7933269605727424479_o.jpg

This replaces Titanium bars and connectors with PLA and/or XT. The one in the pictures has XT and PLA components. The cost is reduced by 5 times, and it's also interesting because PLA can be deformed with a little heat to be more adapted to the body part.

This devices is currently being tested by a couple of Vets in Belgium, and we are going to test them in mechanical devices to validate the strength.

I'm also working on other things like printed horseshoes and prosthetics for cats and dogs.

Besides that i started now to resell printers and parts, and i'm soon going to take part in the Ultimaker trainings to be able to maintain and do official support.

I'm also continuing to work on my design skills with Fusion 360 (awesome software), and continue to print stuff for clients. I have a lot of things in mind but time is short, hopefully i'll be able to stop my daytime job and work full time in 3d printing (cross fingers)

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Wow very cool story! Also checked out the facebook, some pictures are pretty gross :p (This will probably increase traffic heavily, but consider yourself warned :p)

I know you did this, but didn't hear anything about it for a while. Very interesting user case!

You are really taking off :)

What are the replies like when you use this method from the pet-owners?

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Yes some pictures on the facebook are a little bloody that's why i posted a soft picture!

The pet-owners are pretty enthusiast about this method because it's less expensive mainly, and the pet looks less like terminator after the surgery! We will also provide different colors that will be choosable, so your chihuahua will still look fabulous!

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I'm merely testing things out at the moment as a rookie with more abstract studies that you can find here.

I hope in time to have some more insight into this field and it's possibilities and maybe some more functional design in the end.

 

Thank you for your reply. What was your goal when you decided to buy an Ultimaker? Did you already have a thought on what direction you will be heading after your abstract studies? Functional things for in the house, or? Saw the thread by the way, looking good! Curious to see where this is headed!

 

Well, I'm curious about it too :) I'm having a great time with those abstract studies, but now my first more functional pieces are there as well.

It's great to transform a 3D image into a object, that's for sure. Great for testing things out for design, and art wise it has a lot of potential.

I first came into contact with 3D printing around 15 years ago, but I just couldn't afford it. Now that it's becoming an emerging market I see a lot of potential:

- a breakaway in time from traveling objects across the world towards traveling virtual plans

that you print at home?

- the chance of trowing some objects/designs into this virtual world for free, just to see how that one goes really :)

- etc.

Anyway, I'm having a great time exploring this field with that ultimaker, that's for sure :)

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out it too :)I'm having a great time with those abstract studies, but now my first more functional pieces are there as well.

It's great to transform a 3D image into a object, that's for sure. Great for testing things out for design, and art wise it has a lot of potential.

Anyway, I'm having a great time exploring this field with that ultimaker, that's for sure :)

 

What kind of functional parts have you made? For your own use at home?

The potential of 3D Printing is indeed huge. In so many levels. Independency, peer to peer networking, globalisation, less waste, faster and more development, democratising markets etc. So many beautiful things. But that is a whole other topic ;)

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Yeah, I needed a bowl so I designed one and printed it out :)

next to that a cutlery design for appetizers.

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/view/17505-some-first-designs

I hope it's the start towards more functional pieces.

Right now I'm thinking an even bigger bowl with the use of fragmented elements,

but that one isn't sorted out just yet :)

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Yes, you are totally right about the stability of heavier systems.

This system is meant to be taken on worldwide journeys, so you have to take it in your normal luggage. Most airlines have a restriction of 20-23kg. So if you are travelling as photographer you have the coise of not taking a motion system with you or taking one which just a little bit weaker than a heavy system ;)

 

 

I have bought my UM2 for building camera motion control systems for timelapse photography. Without a 3D-printer those products would not be possible to manufacture.

An other benefit from 3D-printing is the low weight of plastic, which is a huge factor for products which are used outdoors. A conventional design would be much heavier and from the design not so appealing.

Since I produce those products in small series, the prints are manufactured for the use in the endproduct and the printer gives me the flexibility to test different designs and prototypes in a very cheap and fast way.

Further information and pictures on my website:

http://puremoco.com/

 

Thanks for your reply. I would think low weight could also be a disadvantage.. doesn't weight equal imbalance or instability? How do you use/design it, that this is not the case?

 

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I am an architect, and I always used to work in my projects with physical models. I just think that it´s easier to understand anything if you can have it in your hands, touch it and see it from all possible angles.

With the develop of 3d software you are able to make a virtual building with as much elements as you want to draw. It´s a incredibly powerful tool not only to show the projects, but to control costs, materials, etc. But developing a project so deeply, means that it´s difficult to find extra time to make a physical model, and also is a shame to grab the 2d plans and start cutting cardboard or whatever with a cutter when you have a nice beautiful detailed 3d model in your computer. I just thought was very stupid to have so an accurate virtual model and don´t be able to transfer it to the real world... until I heard about 3d printing.

I had a lot of expectations, and I was convinced I found the perfect tool to complement the 3d virtual model: the 3d real model.

I must say that in the short time I have my printer, I was not able to print a single proper building prototype, just because the software I work with (archicad and allplan) is not designed for 3d printing. They are so accurate, a 1:1 scale, that so many details makes just a mess in a 1:100 or 1:200 model. They are also not clean files to 3d print with. That means I need a lot of post production time to get something respectable.

Meanwhile, I use the printer with Rhino+Grasshopper to design spare parts, to fix things, to experiment or just to make another kind of projects or prototypes wich has nothing to do with my initial purpose.

I have to say that despite I am a little bit dissapointed, I discovered a fascinating technology, very versatile, that is opening my mind in a complete new way.

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Mainly for customers. Mostly small parts to a variety of techniques/devices that were damaged, and finding them on sale is not possible. Now prepare a small project with the local ethnographic Museum, a model of the military fortress of the 18th century on the site of which grew up the town where I live. Also, plans print models of local attractions (they then will paint with acrylics). For myself is basically a variety of things for the house like curtains or holders for tools.

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I must say that in the short time I have my printer, I was not able to print a single proper building prototype, just because the software I work with (archicad and allplan) is not designed for 3d printing. They are so accurate,  a 1:1 scale, that so many details makes just a mess in a 1:100 or 1:200 model. They are also not clean files to 3d print with. That means I need a lot of post production time to get something respectable.

 

I use revit - so like you have this 3d model in the system - and it has taken a while to work out how to export the model and then 'wrap it' to create a single solid stl that can be printed - and in the software I often have a 'printing' set that I use to extract some of the information like this; ..... 5a33115d1c22e_2013-10-1509_54_58.thumb.jpg.d0b3b72ea7f763fc42486db6fc92db6d.jpg

and this

5a33115d4f585_2015-01-2811_08_45.thumb.jpg.281b5038c7732ef9c9addd46c91e2a68.jpg

and am developing a new arm for e-nable

5a33115e34cca_2014-12-0915_02_55.thumb.jpg.81d5c2e63ee0aa4be4a9cd861a8be584.jpg

5a33115d1c22e_2013-10-1509_54_58.thumb.jpg.d0b3b72ea7f763fc42486db6fc92db6d.jpg

5a33115d4f585_2015-01-2811_08_45.thumb.jpg.281b5038c7732ef9c9addd46c91e2a68.jpg

5a33115e34cca_2014-12-0915_02_55.thumb.jpg.81d5c2e63ee0aa4be4a9cd861a8be584.jpg

Edited by Guest
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