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Has anyone had success with the Olson 1.75mm conversion?

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If you can get it inside the regular bowden let me know and I'll send you an STL file you can print in a few minutes o keep them from slipping inside each other.

Anders Olsson claims the "3mm" bowden works fine for 1.75mm.  I'm skeptical.  I'm guessing he printed pretty slow.

 

Ever try out the 1.75 kit? I was having those issues with jamming and we figured it was the feeder.

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Btw I been using the 1.75mm version of the olsson for a few weeks, since I never used a um2hotend before it was a bit confusing to adjust the tension to keep the i2k/ptfe in place but now that it's all set it's printing a bit better than my umo+ hotends. Also I was able to print a ultirobot at 50mm/s 0.1layer at 188C fans at full (with a fancap designed for umo print area).

IMG_0195.thumb.JPG.725d43cee1527e1da1a774c1c131a8a8.JPG

Btw I don't think that with the standard knurdted bolt the 1.75mm version will work 'fine'. On mine I use a mk7 with IRobiertI feeder and a 6-2mm bowden. It's printing quite nicely. The um2 knurdted bolt isn't designed for 1.75mm filament and I bet that's giving problems to more than one.

IMG_0195.thumb.JPG.725d43cee1527e1da1a774c1c131a8a8.JPG

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Btw I been using the 1.75mm version of the olsson for a few weeks, since I never used a um2hotend before it was a bit confusing to adjust the tension to keep the i2k/ptfe in place but now that it's all set it's printing a bit better than my umo+ hotends. Also I was able to print a ultirobot at 50mm/s 0.1layer at 188C fans at full (with a fancap designed for umo print area).

IMG_0195.thumb.JPG.725d43cee1527e1da1a774c1c131a8a8.JPG

Btw I don't think that with the standard knurdted bolt the 1.75mm version will work 'fine'. On mine I use a mk7 with IRobiertI feeder and a 6-2mm bowden. It's printing quite nicely. The um2 knurdted bolt isn't designed for 1.75mm filament and I bet that's giving problems to more than one.

 

Yeah for me It was going good for a good while. Then my prints would jam after awhile. Always during a retraction. Kills me because it worked fine for a good 30+ hours of printing.

I held off for awhile to see if anyone would figure out the issue. Then I would pop my 1.75 kit back in.

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Well my setup it's quite simple. Um2 hotend eith olsson 1.75 + i2k + tfm. Then I use a 6/2mm bowden tube with a taller bowden clip (youmagine anders olsson). That connected to IRobert| with mk7 bought to reprapworld. Also I used for a long time the um2 feeder motor but it gives errors on retracts (5k in 1h) so now I use just the umo feeder motor. And it's working flawlessly. I had two leaks on the first weeks but was mainly because I didn't knew how much 'tight' the coupler/i2k/TFM sandwich should be.

Basically I used all that I already had for 1.75 on umo but for um2 hotend https://ultimaker.com/en/resources/20556-ultimaker-original-175mm-filament-conversion

I want to test the um2+ feeder motor bolt with 1.75. Aince it has a larger 10mm dia (the knurded bolt) it might work with 1.75. But probably it might not since 2.85 uses too much tension and 1.75 filament needs something a litttle bit less aggressive.

Also important. If you use 1.75 you must change the retraction settings. I made some test with um2 hotend and 1.75 on um2 can use 2.5mm retracts (2.7mm to be sure) and I would not use more than 3.2mm. Why it's this important? Because with each retract you push some heat upwards, so with a thinner filament the heat can crawl faster and jam. But that doesn't happens if you keep you retracts to the correct distance, and with 1.75 you can set them quite low.

My retract test:

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/20403-umo-2-um2-hotend-retract-calibration

The shops that sell 1.75mm should link to stuff like this, or make their own tests. You should not use the same settings for 2.85mm filament with 1.75mm filament. That will cut the amount of users with problems by half.

Edited by Guest
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I have the UM2+ and as far as I know, the the UM2 is also capable of printing with the 1.75 filament without any hardware change. However, ABS can be a bit tricky, you will need to adjust the print temp to the highest setting of 260 degrees. But even then you will need to have printer covered so it is nice and warm.

You just need to change 2 settings on the printer.

1st setting : Go to Material>Settings>Customize>Diameter.

Then rotate the dial till you reach 1.75 and press the dial.

2nd: On top of the filament feeder you will see a small screw that you can adjust the filament feeder size. Tighten the screw the whole way. You will see on the side as the lever goes up to the top.

3rd: Insert your filament

Just one thing to consider, the printer has a habit of changing the diameter back to its default setting of 2.85. So, always check it before a print and after a failed print. Plus, if you turn off the printer then it will also convert back to its default setting.

Maybe these settings can help you out with your problem.

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So I finally installed and tried out my own kit about a month ago and printed about 30 things with it over the month. I tried it with the 3mm bowden tube and a special only-one-on-the-planet 2mm bowden tube and there was no improvement with the smaller bowden tube.

I also installed the iRoberti feeder. I feel that is crucial. When I tried it with my "original" black feeder it could barely touch the filament. I had to loosen the 4 screws and push the motor closer to the filament but even then it didn't have a good grip.

With just the bowden that comes with the printer and the minimum 1.75 conversion (and iRoberti feeder) it worked great for me. The minimum kit comes with an Olsson block drilled to 1.75 instead of 3mm and a teflon part also drilled to 1.75 instead of 3mm.

I used regular 3mm nozzles and it worked great. You won't be able to do cold pulls with the 3mm nozzles and 1.75mm filament but it didn't matter for me. no clogs during the month and if there had been any I would try my nozzle cleaner tool or just remove the nozzle and burn it clean in flame.

@Myrightfoot is right in that you have to tell the printer the new filament diameter of course.

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Without atomics how do you remove the dust or burn particles over time? Weird Carl told me to test that exactly the same, but I found the 3mm nozzles to be quite imprecise when doing my keychains, and I did some tests this with the um2 diamond shaped thingy this week because one of my mk7 died after 9months, and it printed nice, but the filament was squished so bad that it expanded beyond 2mm (with air cooling the room to 25C and heatsink on the extruder). Printing normal thinks it's ok with almost anysetup as long as you just push and push filament, the problem starts when you need to do constant retractions on a short period of time. Just do a 2-3k retraction test and check the filament after, this it's what I got with 1k retracts and um2 diamond shaped thingy:

1kretracts.thumb.jpg.cf0ae5ae626fe9bc9327aba6283ea3ee.jpg

The wider area goes up to 2.03mm, enough to cause friction on the bowden.

Ofc, not many users need to constant retract the filament to get clear texts of 2.8-3mm height. Anyhow I think that to use the IRobertI feeder with the um2 bolt, it needs a curved bearing like the um2+ feeder, but smaller dia.

Btw the filament it's yellow colorfabb perfectly stored and protected, box open 2 weeks ago.

1kretracts.thumb.jpg.cf0ae5ae626fe9bc9327aba6283ea3ee.jpg

Edited by Guest

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I have heard 2 conflicting stories about the filament size and was wondering if anyone here can help clarify which is true.

1) Using 1.75 filament that it is better for the printer's motors.

2) The printer was designed to work best with 2.85 and that is why it is the default setting so it won't make a difference.

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I don't think that 1.75 it's better for the motors or worse. It's a very weird argument sorry.

They designed all the parts extruder, hotend, etc for 2.85 so ofc it works nicely with that filament. That's why to use 1.75 you need to change that core elements so you can print with high quality, not just 'extrude plastic'.

I use 1.75 maintly at first because I had a lot of 1.75 filament but over time I found out that for the stuff I print it's actually better on some keypoints that are important for me. Anyhow with 2.85 you have a more robust filament that can hold more force while extruding it without suffering hysteresis inside the bowden. Also 1.75 needs less heat to print since you are heating less plastic. Ofc, then you get the downside, 1.75 needs to physically move more filament so you get more vibration on the print.

Everything has it's pros/cons but it highly depends on what you need to print.

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I don't think that 1.75 it's better for the motors or worse. It's a very weird argument sorry.

They designed all the parts extruder, hotend, etc for 2.85 so ofc it works nicely with that filament. That's why to use 1.75 you need to change that core elements so you can print with high quality, not just 'extrude plastic'.

I use 1.75 maintly at first because I had a lot of 1.75 filament but over time I found out that for the stuff I print it's actually better on some keypoints that are important for me. Anyhow with 2.85 you have a more robust filament that can hold more force while extruding it without suffering hysteresis inside the bowden. Also 1.75 needs less heat to print since you are heating less plastic. Ofc, then you get the downside, 1.75 needs to physically move more filament so you get more vibration on the print.

Everything has it's pros/cons but it highly depends on what you need to print.

 

Thank you. That actually makes a lot of sense. Never even thought of those things.

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Hey Paolo! It is the 5mm shaft!

About the bowden for 1.75mm filament, I feel that ot works better with a slightly bigger ID for the Tube than usual. As @gr5 says; runs with the 3mm bowden without problems. Certainly, it can take the squished filament.

I just wonder why is it so squished? has it been driven by a direct drive and such hot knurled drive?

In any case, a larger bowden may not work well with flexible filament and also has other drawbacks, but certainly will eat the flat 1.75 filament

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Hey Paolo! It is the 5mm shaft!

About the bowden for 1.75mm filament, I feel that ot works better with a slightly bigger ID for the Tube than usual. As @gr5 says; runs with the 3mm bowden without problems. Certainly, it can take the squished filament.

I just wonder why is it so squished? has it been driven by a direct drive and such hot knurled drive?

In any case, a larger bowden may not work well with flexible filament and also has other drawbacks, but certainly will eat the flat 1.75 filament

 

Hi swordriff, You're already using the 1.75-mm system?

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I been having a recurrent error with 1.75 olsson + i2k + couplers. But the fix it's so weird noone will understand/believe it XD

Basically I tight the i2k/coupler/olsson so tight, that the coupler tip bends, making the inner dia smaller than 2mm. So my fix it's... Once it's all assembled and quite fit (fit enough to avoid any leaks). I take out the nozzle, and (with all assembled on the machine) I insert a 2mm drill bit and clean the inside. By hand it takes a good 5mins (and using a tool so I know that I'm not tilting the bit). Then I 're-drill' the coupler.

Works, so great, that I can't believe it.

But I think this would never happen to a 2.85 user since the inner dia of that setup it's 3.2mm, there's plenty of room to struggle the coupler, and 3.2mm bits ain't just common. But with 1.75mm filament and being the holes of just 2mm on nozzles/ptfe/i2k etc. It really helps to re-drill all once it's all installed. But again, it must be just me that tight everything too much, but I had some hasty leaks on the past and this fix works (if you have the tools to do it right).

I wish E3D would make their nozzles 2.2mm día, that would solve most of the problems I had until I found this fix.

Bruteforce! Sometimes works ;)

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