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KickahaOta

UM3 Firmware feature request: "Print finished / Cooling build plate" display tweak

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For some of my PLA prints (which I print with a 60C build plate temperature), I find that I get a better result if I wait until the plate is down to 40C or 35C before removing the object from the plate. Unfortunately, there's no good way to see the temperature, since when the UM3 interface is on the "Please remove object" screen, you can't go to any other screens before choosing "Print removed", at which point you've put the printer back online and, well, you'd better have removed the object from the plate. :)

 

I was going to suggest putting the build plate temperature on the "Please remove object" screen, but it seemed like that would be significant work and likely wouldn't meet a feature-request bar.

 

Then I printed my first CFE+ object (with the build plate cranked up to 107C), and saw that when the build plate temperature is above 60C, the "Cooling built plate" screen is displayed instead, and that screen does show the temperature. So all of a sudden my request seems at least vaguely reasonable. :)

 

Any thoughts on letting the user configure the temperature threshold at which the "Cooling build plate" screen is displayed in place of the plain "Please remove object" screen? For my purposes it wouldn't even have to be in the UM3 or Cura interface; I'd be happy if it was something I could add to the starting or ending G-code for the printer or the job.

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I usually will take my plates off (I have multiple to do this with) and will soak in water to dissolve the PVA, or put in fridge or even freezer.

 

Having more than one plate makes a lot of sense in that you can get one off and one back on immediately without worrying about knocking pits into your glass. I got that when trying to remove a PLA piece once and it took out two huge pits. I mean real divots. But once I got more than one plate, it has never happened as I have not had to hurry things along.

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That is certainly a viable option. And I imagine that's the option I would use if I frequently used materials that require glue adhesion, since at that point I need to wash the plate anyway. But normal PLA prints don't need that, and when I print a thingy, it's often because I need the thingy as soon as I can safely get the thingy. 🙂

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2 minutes ago, KickahaOta said:

....when I print a thingy, it's often because I need the thingy as soon as I can safely get the thingy

That is when you fridge it or put in freezer. And, yeah, sometimes, PLA needs a bit of PVA slurry on the bottom to make absolutely sure. It also does help protect the plate. That is what got me using the slurry in the first place. And, I just recycle my PVA for my slurry......no spending money when I do not have to and, I hate waste.

 

But if in a hurry, and not soaking in water, just pop in and while the plate cools and releases the print, you can be doing your setup on the next one. I count time as in minutes. Ten minutes saved here and there plus the PLA not grabbing the glass too hard does help.

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