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pineirod

High working temperature filament

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Posted · High working temperature filament

Hi there,

 

We have a S5 we use mainly to print PLA, tough PLA, PVA. 0.4mm nozzles, everything very "standard"

 

We have designed a part which will be exposed to a temperature (working conditions) of 80ºC. It's a case hosting some electronics and LEDs.

 

Could you recommend a filament able to resist high temperature and easy to print?

 

I found a table and the candidates would be: abs, hips, nylon, asa, polycarbonate, polypropylene

 

I see different information about ABS regarding the maximum working temperature. I'd have to check each manufacturer value.

 

Nylons also seems easy to print, but I saw it is flexible. Is it very flexible?

 

All the others are more difficult to print.

 

What would you recommend?

 

thanks

regards,

 

 

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Posted · High working temperature filament

PETG rated to 75°C, easy to print

PETG with carbon fibre: 90° easy to print

Nylon: 110°C but very flexible and can be tricky. Sensitive to moisture and bed adhesion

Nylon with carbon fibre: 110°C. Stiffer but not as stiff as PETG with carbon. Have a roll but not tried yet.

 

I would choose PETG with carbon fibre myself.

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Posted · High working temperature filament

Hi,

 

Thanks for the recommendation. Unfortunately PETG is not available in any of the vendors I can choose from.

 

CPE+ and PC seem promising but apparently difficult to print

 

CPE+ seems easier to support.

 

Which one is easier to print?

 

thanks

 

 

 

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Posted (edited) · High working temperature filament

Sorry, no experience printing them (hence not mentioning them).

Hopefully others can chime in.

Edited by AndersK

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Posted · High working temperature filament

Hi pineirod, check out our materials product page.

 

We've created a filter mechanism which allows you to find a suitable material based on particular properties. Everything displayed there is compatible with an Ultimaker S5 (in some cases using a CC core if it's a composite). If using a third-party material listed there, you can use the Marketplace in Cura to download a corresponding profile, so the slicing configuration legwork is all done for you.

 

Data sheets are also available if you want to take a deep-dive into properties.

 

Hope this helps

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Posted · High working temperature filament

I though that CPE+ is same as PETG. ???

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Posted · High working temperature filament

There's multiple ones you can use. 

 

Nylon can be a real pain to print, Nylon 12 is good, very high HDT and is really sturdy, not very flexible when hot and not super hygroscopic.

 

Nylon 6 is also very good but if it's hot and wet then it becomes incredibly flexible but if kept dry, it's also very good and much easier to print, also has a high enough HDT.

 

Nylon will warp if the prints are bigger, I find it almost impossible to get a warp free nylon print that's large and my printer has a hot bed and a full enclosure, it will peel the tape off the bed with it as it warps.

 

How big are your parts?

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Posted · High working temperature filament

Hi,

 

Yes, I saw the material page and narrowed down the choices to the CPE+ and PC (we need it black, it has some LEDs inside)

 

Let's say it has a prism shape with 10x10x5 cm3 (4x4x2 inches3) and we will need supports (new design to be made).

 

According to the Ultimaker Nylon properties, it has a glass transition temperature of 50ºC.

 

And yes, it seems CPE and PETG is the same thing (different brand names)

 

thanks

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted · High working temperature filament

That might not be wise to print with Nylon then.

 

There's high temp PLA's out there which can do upwards of around 100*C

 

Can't remember the name but I know it exists.

 

Nylon or any descendant of nylon I think will be out of the question due to warpage, perhaps someone else is better than I am with Nylon and can work around it but I can't do large prints. ABS was also a nightmare for me.

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Posted · High working temperature filament

Thanks for the tip. I found the HT PLA from proto pasta (CDP12805) but it is not clear to me the working temperature. I sent them an email

 

I think we'll go for the CPE+ or PC since it is easier to order for us

 

cheers,

 

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Posted · High working temperature filament
19 hours ago, pineirod said:

Hi,

 

Yes, I saw the material page and narrowed down the choices to the CPE+ and PC (we need it black, it has some LEDs inside)

 

Let's say it has a prism shape with 10x10x5 cm3 (4x4x2 inches3) and we will need supports (new design to be made).

 

According to the Ultimaker Nylon properties, it has a glass transition temperature of 50ºC.

 

And yes, it seems CPE and PETG is the same thing (different brand names)

 

thanks

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Nylon, the glass transition temperature is misleading, as it stays solid and rigid (if you can call Nylon rigid at all) well past that temperature - actually, it is one of the more temperature resistant materials, I expect it to be able to go to at least 100°C without a significant degradation in material properties. If its flex doesn't hurt your application, I would certainly give it a try. 

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Posted · High working temperature filament

I would maybe print with an annealable material. These print super easy (like PLA) and by putting them in an oven (at 110 degrees) you will be able to anneal them. An example is the material below. I expect more brands to have this type of material (we even have our brand for example). 

 

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Posted · High working temperature filament

I watched the video. It looks very promising the volcano PLA.

 

Unfortunately I can't order it (it's not in our ordering system). I'll first try with CPE+, if it doesn't work I'll find a way

 

thanks

 

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Posted (edited) · High working temperature filament

I print with ABS myself.

 

https://ultimaker.com/materials/abs

 

Withstands temperatures of up to 85 °C

 

I had problems with ABS myself. 85C (185F) means I can't go over 185F. The max I needed was around 190F. I usually go 170-180F (max), but it was definitely close at times due to the 185F max temp range.

 

Switching to PC though (tomorrow I might change out the filament if not the 30th).

 

https://ultimaker.com/materials/pc

 

Polycarbonate - PC has the ability to withstand 110C if not 112C/113C

 

It's not the easiest to print from the looks of it like ABS (ABS isn't easy to print, but I did just fine) and I think you need an enclosure, but it's safer than ABS (ABS is kind of harmful - has a warning) and has a higher heat resistance than most 3D plastics and/or filaments.

 

Glass transition at 112 - 113 C

 

110C alone is 230F - I don't go over 190F-200F so that works perfectly for me for now plus I have comfort room myself.

 

side note: you need breakaway and that's experimental if you go with PC. PC won't work with PVA from what I understand.

 

PC-compatibility.png

 

https://ultimaker.com/en/resources/22231-how-to-print-with-ultimaker-pc

 

Ultimaker PC is not an easy-to-print material because it tends to warp and delaminate if the printing environment and settings are not perfect.

 

From the original pc link.

 

Flame retardant characteristics

 

Edited by e23

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