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Ultimaker 2 Idea ? Foldable Glass Plate ?

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Ultimaker 2 Idea ? Foldable Glass Plate ?

I recently printed a very large flat roof element on my ultimaker 2.

the print came out perfectly but trying to get it off the glass was a nightmare.

I had used maybe a little too much prit stick and that sucker was glued...

So I put the model under running water and still no go... so I took my normal swiss army knife and tried to pull it off with that.

The roof exploded off the glass under the pressure and the knife landed 7mm into my left arm.... :-(

So I thought what might be a solution.

And then I thought what if the the normal glass plate wasnt only one single piece but maybe 6 or 7 slices of glass. meeting sharply but with small strong hinges on both sides.

I could print anything I want... wait for the glass to cool. slide the whole thing off the bed and LIKE CRACKING A CHOCOLATE BAR PIECE OFF... bend my 6 part glass bed and click my model off.

Sometimes that wont even be needed but just for those models that dont want to play ball... ;-)

Here is a quick rendering of my idea :-)

What do you think guys ?

Ian :-)

folder.jpg

 

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Pretty good idea

a thing that might be to consider is how the strenght of the single glass plates is.

I think by folding them there might occur some torque force as the model sticks on the glas while trying to fold what may result in kinda bending the glass. Ok glass is flexible in a way so why not giving it a try. Most restistant glass may be securit type. Print the part of the frame u showed and try. Glas is available online as u know anyway or thru special companies. If you want I connect you to a glass company I bought several glass parts from in the past.

cheers

nudel

 

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Not quite sure I understand how those black hinges in the model work but that aside I have one little issue with it on first glance. How would you make the pieces of glass meet up without creating "large" valleys for the plastic to squeeze into (creating a similar pattern as the blue tape but larger) while keeping the edges safe to handle? I imagine you would have to have a pretty big chamfer to make the pieces comfortable to grab and put force on?

 

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Patient: Doctor, Doctor, it hurts when I do this!

Doctor: Then don't do this!

Because you used too much glue stick, you are trading a simple, (relatively) inexpensive print bed material for something complex, expensive and sharp-edged. I can imagine several failure scenarios including head crashes at the wrong spot chipping a panel edge, sliced open palms, concave bed along one axis from warp forces bending the hinge, loose and broken hinges, etc.

Instead, perhaps a 1:3 dilution of PVA based glue (wood glue, school glue) instead of pritt stick, and a sharp edged spatula instead of a knife. To flex the bed to pop the print off, perhaps there is a thin flexible plastic sheet material bonds only poorly with PLA, ABS, etc., will hold tight to a rigid, flat bed substrate when hot, but release for flexing when cooled.

 

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right u r

during dismantling old flat sceen monitors I found several very interesting thin flexible plastic sheets of different type inside. Only as a hint.... Maybe one of you out there can dismantle a monitor and give it a try. I have to look after the parts, maybe I stored them. If so, I will be happy to send to someone who is interesting in trying this.

cheers

nudel

 

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Maybe Lexan could be interesting? It's neither cheap nor easily available, but pretty much indestructible (safety "glass" application, going up to full ballistic protection).

You could shoot your prints off the build plate :) (gun-wielding maniac in me speaking... :D)

There's lots of different types, and it's difficult to find datasheets, but there are definetly types that have a melting temperature above 100°C, so it may even be suitable as a HBP, at least for lower-temperature applications (PLA).

 

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Maybe something else to think about:

What if you put a thin and flexible sheet on top of the existing platform (for example one made of Lexan :D)

When your print is finished, you take off the printed part together with said topmost sheet.

Bend the sheet slightly and your printed part should just pop off.

Doesn't work for heated beds I'm afraid...

/edit:

I could actually imagine doing just that on my printers. Even if you have a heated bed, just don't heat it when you use the flexible sheet...

All you need is some way to fix the sheet on the platform and you'll need to adjust your levelling / z-endstop.

 

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That is what I was envisioning, the sheet set on top of an aluminum bed. Downward facing tabs on all four sides of the sheet could be used to hold the sheet firm to clamps or clips on the bed that don't impinge on the print area.

 

Maybe something else to think about:

What if you put a thin and flexible sheet on top of the existing platform (for example one made of Lexan :D)

When your print is finished, you take off the printed part together with said topmost sheet.

Bend the sheet slightly and your printed part should just pop off.

Doesn't work for heated beds I'm afraid...

/edit:

I could actually imagine doing just that on my printers. Even if you have a heated bed, just don't heat it when you use the flexible sheet...

All you need is some way to fix the sheet on the platform and you'll need to adjust your levelling / z-endstop.

 

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Tape is different. Tape sucks. You have to apply it with care, damage it every time you take off a part, have to pry it off... -.-

I don't like tape...

Carbon fiber heated beds? I thought these weren't suitable for temperatures above 80°C (don't they generate unhealthy epoxy fumes???).

Anyways, I don't know about everything that's going on in the 3D printer scene, but thinking about it - it would be really strange if no one else had thought about a flexible build plate before ;)

 

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Bah epoxy shmepoxy. Real men inhale unhealthy fumes for breakfast.

Joking aside, the temperature resistance of carbon fiber depends on the epoxy used, and there are some resins which can normally go much higher than our heat bed temps, and presumably don't produce fumes at those said temps. The question is, who can tell which epoxy was used for those plates from the link I posted... :)

 

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