Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Sign in to follow this  
Blizz

Help with drilling out nozzle

Recommended Posts

I'd like a larger hole in my nozzle to be able to print laywoo-d3 and laybrick etc (probably .6mm?) without clogging.

Unfortunately I really don't have the equipment.

Is there anyone here (within driving distance of Antwerp, Belgium) who can and wants to help me out? Would be much appreciated!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Afaik the nozzle and heater block are one part on the UM2, right?

That makes it a bit more complicated to drill out (since most 0.6mm drills would be only a few mm short).

Ideally, this should be done on a mill with a precision x-y-table. With this, you could drill through the nozzle from the tip instead of going through the whole block.

Should also work with a drill press, but it takes a bit more finesse to align the nozzle correctly.

I have a mill, but I'm not even in Europe :(

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I definitely don't want to start drilling the way the linked video above shows. That's why I started a new topic about it instead of just reacting in the one where that video was already posted ;)

The weight of the entire block is completely unbalanced, as the heater block sticks out to the side of the nozzle. It would never rotate without hopping all over. You can pretty much forget centering your drill that way.

In this case it's the drill that will need to rotate.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did it with a stationary drill and a rotating nozzle assembly, but that was with both the block and the drill clamped securely in a lathe ;)

I really recommend to use a lathe or a mill (or a really good precision drill press if you are lucky to have one of those) to do this operation (could be accomplished with either one, just different way of mounting the nozzle assembly and what part that is stationary)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go with .7mm or .8mm. The thicker the drill bit the stronger it is and it's less likely to break off inside. Also I recommend drilling from the back and *not* the tip side. I have a .7mm drilled hole (UM2) and it was done by a friend with better tools than me in new york city.

This is why you should have bought a UM Original. :) The UM Original is easier (and cheaper) to customize. You can buy sets of 10 nozzle diameters on ebay for UM Original.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that was easy.

After going through the agony of obtaining a spare nozzle for my UM2 so I'd have a backup, I cleaned out my existing nozzle thoroughly, polished the inside shiny with Brasso and a q-tip, and drilled it out with a .5mm carbide drill bit with an 1/8" Shank = http://www.mcmaster.com/#2841A81.

I used my inexpensive drill press at 3100rpm, held the nozzle by hand on top of a machinist's vise to keep it level but allow a bit of slop for self-centering, and slowly drilled it out from the inside. Since the inside of the nozzle is tapered before the actual orifice, the bit centered itself easily, and drilled a perfectly round hole (under 8X magnification), or close enough to perfect for me.

I re-mounted the nozzle, and used 600/1500/2000 grit sandpaper successively along the back edge of the printbed (adjusting the height with the bed-leveling) to open up the flat on the tip a bit and polish it, and it's presently printing .8mm lines perfectly in .16mm layers. The tip looks flat and round, as does the hole, and it is printing smooth even lines.

Printing is a Lot faster, as I can now use one external loop where I needed two before (or two instead of three), and the parts I manufacture will be structurally stronger because of fewer wider loops. The .51mm nozzle also moves about 60% more plastic, and with less back-pressure on the feeder I expect fewer skips at the same temperatures.

Well worth the annoyance of procuring a spare .4mm nozzle, and an easy project - I could have done it easily with a hand drill or a Dremel if I didn't have a drill press.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So do you still plan to sell your UM2?

 

Remains to be seen. RPW declined to produce Ultimaker nozzles, as he is just too busy with J-head manufacture. I'm a lot happier with the .5mm nozzle than with the .4mm - .4mm is just too stinking slow, and too fussy about clogging.

If my UM2 remains reliable (600+ print-hours so far according to the Advanced settings), I may keep it and the Zeni Kinetic. I certainly don't Need two printers, but it sure would be nice to have one available when the inspiration strikes while something else is running...

Does anyone know what the increment is for one notch on the rear bed-leveling procedure? I'm curious how much I shaved off the flat on the .5 nozzle.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like a larger hole in my nozzle to be able to print laywoo-d3 and laybrick etc (probably .6mm?) without clogging.

Unfortunately I really don't have the equipment.

 

Ah man. If I had known that, I would have put one of the nozzles in our lathe. Your best bet would be a workshop with a lathe.

2nd best would be a drill-press. Those are much more common (I even have one at home) And manually center the nozzle in a large clamp while the spinning drill hovers over it. Won't be 100% perfect, but should be do-able. Just take your time to center it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daid I thought that my current nozzle was going to be unusable. Since the filament creeping upwards is not a direct consequence of the cut I have, I just figured I might as well try to drill it out.

I didn't even know yet when we were at the Ulti-Evening.

Can they do that at ProtoSpace btw? Otherwise I'll just bring it with me next time ;) I am certainly prepared to pay for the effort, either in cookies (if they accept that currency) or plain ol' cash ;)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did it :-P

Drilled my old UM2 nozzle to 0.6.

First cleaned it out with a gasburner, then just put the nozzle in a workbench and drilled out by handheld dremel ....

Very easy no problem at all, don't put any pressure, just let the dremel do the work (just seconds) and the inside shape of the nozzle will guide the drill to the centre ...

Did no sanding or cleaning, just heated again with the gasburner and pushed some PLA through for cleaning of any metal parts ....

dremel0p6

Also had to replace my heating unit (broke the housing some time ago), this was a bit of a pain, getting the wire in the black sleeve again (I was smart enough to attach a wire to the old one before pulling out, and used the wire again for pulling in the new cable)..

Unfortunately I don't think you can change the nozzle frequently, to be honest i'm really starting to dislike the design, specially the small setscrew in the nozzle is extremely easy damaged...

0p6 spiral

First test is very good if you ask me ...

Spiral cilinder, 0.6 wal, started at 3 mm3/s moving up to, 6, 9, 10.5, up to 12 mm3/s no problem with extrusion at all. And this at 210 celsius....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

real easy and fast (if you don't have to change the heater unit as i had to do).

but ..... I think you can only do it a few times and throw away your nozzle, the setscrew is really easy to damage... this thing is just not made for regular changing....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you see the quality is specially lower on the rounded parts. Think the 0.6 is specially usefull for larger furniture parts or more functional parts .... but all in all not to bad...

0p6 olifant2

0p6 Olifant1

Printed with 0.6 nozzle, 0.2 layer, 50 speed (50x0.2x0.6 = 6mm3/s), while I would normally print high quality at 35x0.1x0.4=1.4mm3/s... And on top this was the last part of fillament on the reel, so very curved ...

As a negative, if you need a certain infill to be able to create decent top layers, you'r waisting a lot more fillament with the 0.6 nozzle ....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Our picks

    • How to 3D print with reinforced engineering materials
      Ultimaker is hosting a webinar where we explain how you can achieve and maintain a high print success rate using these new reinforced engineering materials. Learn from Ultimaker's Product Manager of Materials and top chemical engineer Bart van As how you can take your 3D printing to that next level.
      • 0 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!