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philum2

UM2 Bad infill and increase retraction setting to 60mm/s

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Hello,

First point

I'm having trouble printing the infill

It seams like it just doesn't sticks to the below layer

 

DSCN0652[1]

DSCN0609[1]

speed in the same allover the print (around 50mm/s)

second point

I'm trying to increase to retraction speed to 60mm/s

I thought the modifying the gcode flavor to reprap (marlin) (from ultigcode) would've worked but the printer just doesn't extrude. should to change something in the start/end gcode?

Thanks

 

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Looks like some underextrusion in the infill. What is your infill speed? Also what printing temp (I will assume 200C) and layer height? Knowing those 3 numbers I can tell you if you are printing with reasonable parameters. If you *are* printing with reasonable parameters and still getting underextrusion you can further prove it by doing this test at 230C (test is only valid at 230C):

http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/4586-can-your-um2-printer-achieve-10mm3s-test-it-here/

 

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Looks like some underextrusion in the infill. What is your infill speed? Also what printing temp (I will assume 200C) and layer height? Knowing those 3 numbers I can tell you if you are printing with reasonable parameters. If you *are* printing with reasonable parameters and still getting underextrusion you can further prove it by doing this test at 230C (test is only valid at 230C):

http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/4586-can-your-um2-printer-achieve-10mm3s-test-it-here/

 

infill 20%

speed 40mm/s

it gets better is I lower it to 25mm/s

This is the test I've made 2weeks ago..

DSCN0640

DSCN0641

DSCN0642

on the front side the under-extrusion is very visible, but on the back it seems pretty ok a part for the first part

 

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Take a look at this:

http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/23-a-visual-ultimaker-troubleshooting-guide#underextrusion

You might need to clean your nozzle, under-extrusion can be caused by a partially clogged nozzle.

To clean:

http://support.3dverkstan.se/article/10-the

The cylinder test was done at 230°c ?

Other cause of under-extrusion is temperature too low or speed to high (or both)

 

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1) Those cylinders look fine to me. I think I would consider those "10mm^3/sec" or full speed which is better than most printers. But you need to do the test now, not 2 weeks ago. Your printer may be worse due to a clog, deformed nozzle, dust, twisted/tangled filament, etc.

2) I don't want your infill% I want your infill speed. It should be set to 0mm/sec which makes it the same as normal print speed which is recommended.

3) You didn't answer about layer height. I shouldn't have to ask twice.

4) Assuming 0.2mm layer height, 200C and 40mm/sec...

That's much too fast. At that cold temperature and thick layer height the fastest the machine can go - the absolute limit where you expect occasional failures (every 10 seconds or so) - see dark blue line on this graph:

http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/4127-um2-extrusion-rates-revisited/

I recommend printing at half the speed of the blue line (20mm/sec) or if you are printing .1mm layer then 40mm/sec is just fine. Again, what's your layer height?

Personally I recommend printing at 40mm/sec but hotter - according to the graph 220C is hot enough for .2mm layer at 40mm/sec and 200C is hot enough for .1mm layer at 40mm/sec.

 

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1) Those cylinders look fine to me. I think I would consider those "10mm^3/sec" or full speed which is better than most printers. But you need to do the test now, not 2 weeks ago. Your printer may be worse due to a clog, deformed nozzle, dust, twisted/tangled filament, etc.

 

I think gr5 forgot to put on his glasses this morning. Those cylinders do not look fine to me at all. There are clear signs of under extrusion right from the start.

 

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1) Those cylinders look fine to me. I think I would consider those "10mm^3/sec" or full speed which is better than most printers. But you need to do the test now, not 2 weeks ago. Your printer may be worse due to a clog, deformed nozzle, dust, twisted/tangled filament, etc.

2) I don't want your infill% I want your infill speed. It should be set to 0mm/sec which makes it the same as normal print speed which is recommended.

3) You didn't answer about layer height. I shouldn't have to ask twice.

4) Assuming 0.2mm layer height, 200C and 40mm/sec...

That's much too fast. At that cold temperature and thick layer height the fastest the machine can go - the absolute limit where you expect occasional failures (every 10 seconds or so) - see dark blue line on this graph:

http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/4127-um2-extrusion-rates-revisited/

I recommend printing at half the speed of the blue line (20mm/sec) or if you are printing .1mm layer then 40mm/sec is just fine. Again, what's your layer height?

Personally I recommend printing at 40mm/sec but hotter - according to the graph 220C is hot enough for .2mm layer at 40mm/sec and 200C is hot enough for .1mm layer at 40mm/sec.

 

Hi, regarding the images in the first post:

infill speed was set to 0mm/s so same speed as normal

layer was 0.1mm at 40mm/s

temp at 200c°

I printed the test again

here is the result:

 

DSCN0701

DSCN0703

 

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