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Tim_bc

ColorFabb PLA/PHA Exposure Temp

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Posted · ColorFabb PLA/PHA Exposure Temp

Hi guys,

I was hoping someone off hand knew what the maximum temperature PLA can be exposed too after printing and still function properly.

I have a friend who built a custom projector fan shroud, but it will be experiencing temperatures of 65-degree celsius. I checked the colorfabb spec sheets and all it says is less than 155 degrees celsius.....

If anyone happens to know from experience it would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Tim

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Posted · ColorFabb PLA/PHA Exposure Temp

It softens quite a lot at 65 degrees, so i would not use PLA if it would be exposed of temperatures of 60 degrees or higher. I would go for a Co-polyester like Colorfabb nGen instead.

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Posted · ColorFabb PLA/PHA Exposure Temp

You could also try ABS.

 

Thanks, but I'm trying to avoid ABS if at all possible.

Thanks though,

Tim

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Posted · ColorFabb PLA/PHA Exposure Temp

If you leave a part printed in PLA in a hot car in the sun, it *will* warp, although some brands warp more than others. Thus PLA is unsuitable for anything that gets hotter than ca. 50°C.

If it needs to get *really hot*, as in projectors, you might consider casting: make the mould in PLA, or make the original model in PLA and then cast a silicone mould from it, and then cast the final item in a heat resistant material (clay, gipsum, whatever) in that mould.

Plastic in combination with projector lamps that go up to several hundred degrees celcius, doesn't sound like a safe idea to me.

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Posted · ColorFabb PLA/PHA Exposure Temp

 

If you prefer PLA there are high temperature types that are reportedly good to 120 degrees after heat treatment. I've not tried them yet but here's an example:

https://www.proto-pasta.com/products/high-temp-pla-v2-0

 

Great link! Thank you, I'll be taking at look at this soon.

 

Hello fellow Canadian! :)

You can get Proto-Pasta stuff at http://filaments.ca. Not sure if they have the high temp stuff, but take a look. It'll be cheaper than ordering from the US. :( (I know I just did this exact thing.)

http://makergeeks.com in the States also has high temp PLA. I am just starting to test it now.

I have also used ColorFabb XT and Taulman T-Glass for higher heat resistance to good effect. But they have their own learning curves. nGen is probably better than XT, but I have not tried it yet. Taulman stuff is quite nice to work with though.

Polycarbonate would probably work very well, but it can be a massive pain to work with.

One additional thought would be to cover the area exposed to heat with one or more layers of Kapton tape. That stuff is thin and can handle up to 260C with little heat transfer through it. Space age stuff! :D

Anyway, just some thoughts. Hope it helps! :)

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Posted · ColorFabb PLA/PHA Exposure Temp

nGen has good heat properties but from the info sheet, not as strong as PLA

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