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Nicolinux

Gluestick mandatory with heated bed? UM2

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After reading the manual for the UM2 (sorry for not linking to it, using the iPhone to post), one may assume that the gluestick is mandatory even with the heated bed.

Shouldn't this be marked as optional? Or at least marked as needed with ABS.

I have use a heated bed before and there was never a situation where I'd had to use a gluestick.

What do you think?

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The glue-stick is by no means mandatory. However, if you write in the manual "You might want to use it", it will often be interpreted as "You don't have to use it if you don't feel like it". As the manual is aimed at ensuring that you are able to create a successful print, this is a pretty logical choice to make.

 

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I haven't tried glass yet but people report that it is MUCH less sticky than blue tape or cardboard or Kapton tape.

At MakerFaire NYC they used glue stick *and* had to heat the bed to 50C. When they didn't do both parts popped off.

But it's complicated. Each part is different. You can get away with neither for certain parts (small parts). It sounds like wood glue and water is better than glue stick.

It would be nice if UM had a scientist who would spend a month experimenting with sticking and then another month experimenting with fan speeds, then another month experimenting with bridging, then another week experimenting with maximum flow speeds. All of these with various PLA. Maybe some day. In the mean time we have to rely on people like Illuminarti who do pretty good job with these kinds of experiments (but don't spend the month the issues deserve).

 

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We've had the UM2 for four weeks now and printed mostly without the glue stick. It's great for presentation and demos. However, depending on model, plastic type and how careful you level your bed, sometimes you need the glue stick. And when I started a 44 hour print I wanted to be pretty sure it stayed put ;) But usually it would come loose within the first 10 layers or so if it sticks by then it usually sticks the whole print.

Actually yesterday we started a 10 hour print with Colorfabb XT and left office. It had come loose shortly after and actually molten XT had filled the entire fan shroud, it took two hours to clean out :( we had the bed set for 70C but we made another try today where we put the bed to 75C and that print just finished beautifully. T(g) of XT is 75C so that makes sense :)

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glue stick is messy... I found that wood glue slurry (pretty much the same as gluestick, IIRC), dries up in a very consistent matte film, that works pretty good for ABS (95C) bed temp... it doesn't have the massive holding-down of cheap chinese kapton take at 110C, but it is easy to work with.

 

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