Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
gothampixel

ColorFabb Copperfill

Recommended Posts

So ColorFabb announced Copperfill

With this disclaimer;

*Testing showed reliable results using the all metal hot-ends, such as the E3D and the Makerbot Replicator 2 hotend. Hotends which use a teflon isolator coupler can generate adhesion to the copper filament possibly leading to clogs and is there for not recommended for novice users yet.

Any thoughts on the risk of printing this on an Ultimaker 2 and Original?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both the Ultimaker 2 and Ultimaker Original have been able to successfully print with copperFill, but with less reliable results then other hot-ends.

Novice Ultimaker users are not recommended to start playing with these experimental type filaments. You need to be willing to spend some time and effort if you want to print with copperFill on the UM Original en UM2.

BronzeFill prints beautifully on both UM's so if you're not willing to risk copperFill stick to the bronzeFill :)

Gijs

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what are the things to take care of?

speed, temperature? keep the material moving, so the temp. cannot crawl upwards?

is a bigger nozzle a benefit?

 

Probably all of the above.

I cannot print woodfill fine without clogging on my UM2 with 0.4mm nozzle if I print slower than 45 mm/s. Same goes with Bronzefill. I cannot get uniform print without going at 50mm/s.

I was able to print 0.1mm layers with woodfill fine at 100 mm/s even if its not recommended under 0.2mm.

At that speed temp must be a little higher. If you have a bigger nozzle it mean more material can come out.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm testing copperFill at the moment and what I can say so far:

The combination of speed and temperature for copperFill is not that different then any other filament.

The most important thing is to keep the material not too long in the nozzle, the material needs to flow, otherwise the heat will go up to the teflon isolator coupler and the copperFill will stick to it.

I've managed to print at speeds of 30mm/s up to 100mm/s with a 0.4mm nozzle.

The material prints very nice and has a beautiful surface finish.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm also interested in conductivity :)

 

ColorFabb was guest speaker at the Ultimaker evening in August and someone asked them the same question when they made the announcement of copperFill, the answer was unfortunately 'no'.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my first print with copperfill:

 

Compared to bronzefill:

 

In my (limited) experience it takes a bit more elbow-grease to get copperfill to shine, but when it shines, it is more reflective than bronzefill. The copperfill print seems to be slightly softer than the bronzefill one.

Edit: Compared to the official photo above, the unpolished print looks a different for me. The color is - for a lack of a better description - a bit more belony (leverworst) color; more pink, less yellow.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The model (nicknamed "punthoofd") is my universal testbed model, designed to print fast. It is a spiralised print, and prints in 35-ish minutes on my UMO. I still have to get around to fixing the hole in the head (which is a fundamental issue with spiralising, not so much a printing problem).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No teflon problems sofar, but I did take extra care not to leave the material in the heated hotend so heat can't creep up. It makes perfect sense that this could be a problem, because copper is more heat conductive than bronze (and certainly more conductive than pla).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can print with CopperFill with an UMO and UM2.

The point is that the copper particles are transferring the heat of the nozzle upward the filament just like BronzeFill, only faster.

When you print too slow (beneath 50mm/s) the heat will crawl faster upwards then the filament throughput, when the filament gets warm at the height of the teflon isolator it will stick to it resulting in a clog.

To prevent the speed will go beneath 50mm/s, disable the 'minimum layer time (sec)' in Cura by setting the value at 1.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Terms of Use Privacy Policy