Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
LePaul

Glue stick or...?

Recommended Posts

I don't see a lot of documentation about use of the included glue stick with the heated bed printers.

I noticed many do not use it, instead taking advantage of the heated bed

When I tried out the glue stick, I was wondering what to do with those smears :) Use a wet cloth and spread it around?

I know I have read where some use a few drops of wood glue and water, paint it on the glass and allow to dry

I'm just really curious what people have used and suggest?

And if just glass printing, what's the sweet spot for temps?

I really want to retire the blue tape for good since it takes TONS of force to remove my prints on the UMO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't use glue. I just heat 65C fist layer at 30mm or slower. Ofc if your print needs fans before 5mm then, glue, hairspray, anything that works. Bluetape it's great anyway if you have overhangs at the beggining, to set fan high and forget about corners lossing adhesion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh also, if you don't mind touching the print after, a skirt 0.3-0.6 separated of the print and 3-4 lines surrounding the pirnt, work wonders for me for fans on. Also for some filaments I need the first layer to be at lest 205-210C or bed 70C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use glue stick sparingly and spread it around with a damp sponge. If you use too much you can lift some glass off the top. 70c for pla and 100c for abs and fan on early to reduce elephant's foot. You can do quite a few prints before reapplying. Tend to clean off and reapply for a big print. You need to let the bed cool down a fair bit before it will release it's grip. Im interested to hear what others are doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wood glue and water (~1:10 solution) applied to a 60 degrees hot bed with a sponge...

Water vaporizes quickly leaving a super thin and very even layer of glue that sticks PLA very nicely...

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes you need glue sometimes not. I use it as a just in case. Cos a if a print comes off then you would be wishing you used the glue in the first place.

I normally lightly wet the glass the wipe on the glue. The wet glass makes it so only a thin layer sticks.

This can last a very long time without having to re apply more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PVA glue is what's suggested, right?  Like these....

 

Its PVA wood glue yes... Be careful to not make too thick a solution, you can get large prints to stick really really well with that... Go with 1 part glue to 10 parts water, or maybe even less (I actually pulled a shard of glass off my borosilicate plate with a large print, because I used too thick a solution).

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic has been covered extensively all over the forum, but essentially I use UHU stic (that's how they misspell it), heat the bed to 60C and draw lines across the glass. The heat helps to melt the glue a little. After that, it works for about a week, even after being overprinted and being cooled in the freezer (makes for easy removal). The stick that came with the Ultimaker 2 simply does not compare.

If I'm not too lazy, I use acetone juice even for PLA, and spread it by dribbling a line of juice across one edge of the bed and then using an 8mm steel rod like a rolling pin to create an even coat across the glass. The only drawback with this method is that the models will pull off the acetone film underneath them, so it's not re-usable, unlike glue stick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic has been covered extensively all over the forum, but essentially I use UHU stic (that's how they misspell it), heat the bed to 60C and draw lines across the glass. The heat helps to melt the glue a little. After that, it works for about a week, even after being overprinted and being cooled in the freezer (makes for easy removal). The stick that came with the Ultimaker 2 simply does not compare.

If I'm not too lazy, I use acetone juice even for PLA, and spread it by dribbling a line of juice across one edge of the bed and then using an 8mm steel rod like a rolling pin to create an even coat across the glass. The only drawback with this method is that the models will pull off the acetone film underneath them, so it's not re-usable, unlike glue stick.

 

I've seen a few threads and with the search not working well, I thought it best to ask.

Going from a UMO with no heated bed to one with a heated bed has been quite interesting. A lot of things you Ultimaker 2 owners take for granted is brand new to me! :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to share my new glue method.

Get a pper towel, put a good drip of window washer product, and a very small touch of spray from a hair lacquer (just one small press of the spray on the area). Then clean the glass with it.

Works like a charm. One of my umo+ bed glass has lost adhesion after a year (no idea why since I give them much care). Now with this I can keep printing and using fans fast. When the bed colds to 34C it starts to unstick (the plastic sounds) and at 30C it's easy to take the prints out.

On my others umo+ the glass sticks to the pla prints without any trouble, but this other machine it's older and the glass has lost its 'magic'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used up my ColorFabb black PLA/PHA and had to switch over to Matterhackers Black Pro Series PLA. It suggests lower temps than the ColorFabb and went well. My first test print had a rough buttom, which lead me to realize the nozzle should be a closer to the bed. (Neat way to find out!) It wasn't shiny smooth as other prints.

I had a print fail on me too. The part came off the bed while printing on glass at 60C. It was a 3 inch wide by 5 inch tall piece. 2 inches up, it popped loose. Thankfully I caught it before the air spaghetti-plastic got too crazy

I tried it again, same temp (60c) but this time with the glue stick, smudged around with a wet cloth. That did really well, once the bed was cool I really had to wiggle to get that off the bed.

One thing that puzzles me is the overhang on one side was a little bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

I am printing in Colorfabb Ngen and XT as well as Ninjaflex red and translucent on an ultimaker 2 extended and have had great results with adhesion as follows:

bed 'adhesive': I use co-op supermarket home brand super-hold hairspray - 90p/400ml.

its cheap and easy to get hold of on a Sunday :)

process:

remove Print glass and clean with Isoprpyl alcohol

spray a layer on and allow to dry for 5 mins

spray a 2nd layer on and allow to dry for 5mins

refit glass bed and level as normal.

thats it, all done

this lasts for many prints, particularly if you give a very light spray on the bed in place to keep the surface tacky after after 2nd print or so. ( a few squirts is more than enough)

Also, wait until the bed is fully cooled to room temp, way past when it says print finished to have the easiest print removal. I have found this hairspray to be very sticky at 40oC + temp and prints need to be pried off the bed unless the bed is 'cold'

Hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • How to 3D print with reinforced engineering materials
      Ultimaker is hosting a webinar where we explain how you can achieve and maintain a high print success rate using these new reinforced engineering materials. Learn from Ultimaker's Product Manager of Materials and top chemical engineer Bart van As how you can take your 3D printing to that next level.
      • 2 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!