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bigjim

Anyone experience with 3D scanners ?

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what do you want to scan?

how much can you spent on it?

maybe @ultiarjan can tell you more about the Fuel3D..

scanners like Kinect+Skanect, Structure Sensor work oke-ish for people/faces and objects from about 50 cm with a distance from about 50+ cm. Don't expect much detail.

For better detail the David SLS works very good, but not for people (motion/hair) and this scans in the range of 3 cm up to 60cm objects.

Remember that scanning is perfect for organic shapes and not so good for straight objects.

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I did share some experience in the past;

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/11225-fuel3d-scanify

I know, it's a bit decadent after spending so much money, but I did not really took the time to get to know the unit really well... it's stil somewhere on my list :)

It's really important to know WHAT you want to scan. Although the resolution of the Fuel3D is really nice, it has a VERY limited range of use, in terms of size of the item scanned and materials that are scanable.

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We don't have one, but I have seen one in use at a local distributor last year (I don't remember the brand). I found it rather disappointing: it couldn't scan inside an empty cup, under armpits, under a nose, under a car model, in an open mouth,... All these very common things left huge open gaps and/or defects. And then, once you had the scan, you could not really work on it, it was a huge mess of mesh. It only worked well for very simple objects, which you could as well design in 3D.

So, whatever your scanner model of choice would be, I would suggest that you go to a local distributor, and have him scan your typical objects. And let him go through all the post-processing, editing and cleaning-up in front of your eyes. I think that is the only way to know if it is good enough, and if it is workable for you.

Also carefully verify that the scanner produces watertight solid 3D-models. Often 3D-scanners will only produce surface-objects (even with holes in it), that you can not 3D-print. These surface-objects may be good enough for rotating an image on-screen, e.g. for a game or for 3D-visualisation, but not for printing. You really have to see it with your own eyes, I think.

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Good question. My personal preference would be the David, especially at that price. But of course I'm biased now, that I decided myself :p

Anyhow, I think the David is more open, more modding friendly and more versatile. distance and angle between camera and beamer are adjustible and components are more or less industry standard. For someone who is tinkering with a 3d printer, I could imagine the Einscan might be limiting at some point.

I didn't find more detail about the range of sizes, the Einscan can handle. They say maximum 200^3 mm^3 with the turntable and 700^3 mm^3 without. Is that maximum total object size or maximum size per scan? And I didn't find anything about minimum size. For the David you find lots of user examples from coins or even coffee beans (only with mods) up to cars. Most Einscan Examples seem to be in the range of 100..200mm.

The turntable is far less important for SL compared to laser scanning, at least from what I can say due to my first 2 test scans :PThere I usually took like 8 scans around, stitched them together and then looked for missing details like holes due to undercuts. I then chose good orientations to get a nice shot of those regions, often tilted, then one from the top, one from the bottom. If there is still something missing, take another shot. The turntable is only good for very scanning friendly models in my opinion. And still, I find it sexy to have one. Hmm, shouldn't be to difficult to build one, the David software is open for custom hardware ;)At least a rotating platform might be nice that you turn by hand.

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StephenK

I am in the same boat I had a demo of the David scanner at the Mach Show in Birmingham it was not a good demo by any means but when I look at the Ein Scan, I have a feeling the software might be an issue. I have no reason for saying that BUT if the software is buggy and un helpful I think it would be a nightmare. Also the Einscan has just released there new scanner available in the UK for the last 4 weeks so getting hands on one to be demoed is hard. The david scanner now comes with a HD camera but when you start pricing the table up £700.00 just for the turntable I didn't think you would get much change from£4500.00

that said I think I'm opting for the David.. when I can get a better Demo..

Ein Scan was at the TCT Show in Birmingham last year offering a discount....

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The main difference, apart from the price, is the ease of use,

I must say I don't have recent hands on experience with the David scanner, but did buy the Einscan-s

I did some research and saw that the David scanner does have more options for scanning, it does take some more work to setup for a specific object.

The Einscan is very simple to use with the turntable, you can scan an object within minutes, or do a free scan for more complex objects, witch takes as long as you see fit to get all the details in hard do reach parts.

the software is very easy and works great, the stitching is very good and automatic, or manual, if the software has trouble (it rarely does)

The Einscan pro has even wider range of options, and I think is comparable with David system.

But if you can't decide, make sure you can do a live demo, or watch user videos, to make up your mind.

For me it was a price/usability purchase, while I don't mind to tinker, I hated the amount of work to work with the David system (some years ago), the Einscan one button (like Cura) scan option is just great :)

I posted some scan results here

http://3dprintboard.com/showthread.php?14104-Post-your-scans-here-!/page8

Also don't forget, the better resolution the scanner makes, the bigger your PC must be, to handle the enormous files :)

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Remember I have the Einscan -S, not the Einscan Pro :)

the 700mm size is for freescan, and you can scan objects any size you want, but it will only scan 700mm per scan, and the software stitches these together to make the complete scan.

you can move the object in front of the scanner, or move the scanner around the object.

but you have to have the scanner on a tripod.

Smaller scans are a bit tricky, as the scanner has a minimum distance to the objects, the camera's and projector are set for certain distances, and you can't move it closer then the minimum distance, or it won't calibrate.

It projects a cross on the object (free scan) that you can use to make sure the scanner is close to the best distance from the object.

here is a link to the hand of a Rancor model I scanned, on automatic scan on the turntable:

https://www.youmagine.com/designs/rancor-hand-scan-b7dc0afd-1e71-496c-b26a-24205c8d0cc2

it's about 5cm high, and still 100MB after reduction :)

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I tend to use the turntable a lot. It simply saves a lot of time. Instead of having to babysit the scanner while its doing a scan (Make a scan, move object, repeat), you can place the object on the table and tell it to make 50 scans and auto stitch it.

In most cases having 8 - 12 scans of a single object gives pretty good results, but more data tends to increase the quality of the scans. Especially the smarter smoothing algorithms that are used to filter out the high frequency noise of structured light scanners benefit from more data (at the obvious cost of memory & cpu cycles).

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Just been talking to my David Scanner Supplier he tells me there is a new Dual Camera System becoming available, I would wait and see the results but could be Good, He also told me of a new Dual Head 3D Printer coming out from LeapFrog, which also looks good.

The extra Camera ads about £1,200 to the price of the system, so not much Change out of £5,000 Ouch.

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Just been talking to my David Scanner Supplier he tells me there is a new Dual Camera System becoming available, I would wait and see the results but could be Good, He also told me of a new Dual Head 3D Printer coming out from LeapFrog, which also looks good.

The extra Camera ads about £1,200 to the price of the system, so not much Change out of £5,000 Ouch.

 

Don't know about the scaner but the dual leapfrog printer it's like a copy of bcn3d sigma dual extruder printer, but with pancake feeders. I would stay away from that leapfrog printer, specially since bcn3d it's fully opensource.

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